Others

Residential Rental Properties, Policy on

Title: Residential Rental Properties, Policy on
Policy Owner: Facilities Operations & Building Services
Applies to: Existing and Potential: Faculty, Staff, Visiting Scholars and Guests
Campus Applicability: Storrs Currently. If the University acquires residential rental property at any other campus it will apply to such property
Effective Date: August 28, 2017
For More Information, Contact Lynn Hallarin, Director, Business Services Center
Contact Information: 860-486-3632
Official Website: http://rentalproperties.uconn.edu/

REASON FOR POLICY

It is strategically important for UConn to provide and manage short- and long-term housing options for the recruitment and retention of faculty, staff, visiting scholars and other UConn guests. Accordingly, it is University policy to provide housing that is well maintained, attractive and marketable. It is also important that all University owned rental housing be maintained and operated in an economically efficient manner.

POLICY STATEMENT

The Rental Properties Unit of UConn’s Facilities Operations & Building Services maintains a portfolio of rental properties with rental rates designed to support the expenses and improvements necessary to sustain and maintain the portfolio.  Rental properties shall only be made available to Storrs Campus Faculty and Staff, Visiting Scholars and other guests.

The portfolio is comprised of two categories of units: (1) those University-owned houses classified as “Reserved” and those apartments in The Oaks on the Square in Storrs Center; and (2) those University-owned houses not otherwise classified as “Reserved.”   The first category is established to support institutional recruitment and retention objectives, while the second category is to be maintained as a long-term, self-sustaining University asset.

The allocation of rental properties shall be managed in a fair, equitable and open manner.  Rental requests can be initiated in one of two ways: (a) by a Host (defined below); or (b)  by an individual who is a member of the Storrs Campus faculty or staff, a visiting scholar or other UConn guest, as applicable.

Rent will be paid for all rental properties. The amount of rent that is charged will be determined on a market basis through an appropriate analysis.  Rent will be paid either by the individual occupying the property or by the Host.

All rentals must be memorialized in a written agreement signed by an authorized UConn representative and the occupant. The agreement must specify the occupant, the rent, who is paying the rent, the duration of the rental period, and the duration of the occupant’s engagement with UConn.

If a Host is paying the rent, that must be reflected in the written agreement and the agreement must be signed by an authorized representative of the Host.

If the occupant does not pay rent, the fair market value of the rent may be taxable income to the occupant subject to withholding and tax reporting.  The occupant will be responsible for all associated tax liability. To facilitate compliance with tax laws, the Rental Properties Unit of Facilities Operations & Building Services will notify UConn’s Tax & Compliance Office of all rentals where the occupant is not paying rent (e.g. rents is being paid by Host or no rent is paid). .

The Executive Vice President for Administration and Chief Financial Officer (or the successor in function) , in consultation with the Real Estate Working Group, establishes, and approves  any changes to, procedures to implement this Policy.

APPLIES TO

Property covered:  All residential rental properties managed by Facilities Operations & Building Services.  It does not apply to property managed by Residential Life.

Persons covered:  Storrs Campus Faculty and Staff, visiting scholars and other UConn guests. This policy will apply in the event that UConn acquires residential properties at other campuses.  Residential rental properties are not intended for use by students enrolled in UConn undergraduate, graduate or other programs.

DEFINITIONS

“Host” means the UConn Administration, department or academic unit sponsoring the individual who is seeking UConn housing.

“Guest” means Special Payroll employees, long-term consultants, candidates for employment, guest performers (e.g. CRT actors), guest speakers and others similarly situated.

“Storrs Campus Faculty and Staff” means individuals who are regular UConn employees and are employed to work at the Storrs Campus.

“Visiting Scholar” means an expert in an academic discipline or disciplines with a short-term residency at UConn for mutual intellectual enrichment and collaboration.  These individuals are typically scholars or artists on leave from other institutions. However, “Visiting Scholars” also may be unaffiliated and distinguished in their fields, or they may be representatives of governments, higher education institutions or other institutions on official business.  Undergraduate and graduate students are not visiting scholars.

WAIVER AUTHORITY

The President’s office may make exceptions to this Policy or waive the Rental Criteria (contained in the Procedures found at http://rentalproperties.uconn.edu/) when it is in the best interest of the University.

ENFORCEMENT

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with UConn By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for all UConn Employees, and applicable collective bargaining agreements.

SUPERCEDENCE

This policy supersedes and replaces the present “Visiting Scholars Housing Policy,” which was effective on June 2, 2011.

PROCEDURES/FORMS

Procedures and forms can be found at http://rentalproperties.uconn.edu/.

Pricing and other information about rental properties (not including The Oaks) can be found at http://rentalproperties.uconn.edu/ under the “Houses” link.

Pricing and other information about The Oaks can be found at http://rentalproperties.uconn.edu/apartments/.

Policy created:  Approved by the President’s Cabinet (8/28/2017)

Animals on Campus

Title: Animals on Campus
Policy Owner: Office of Institutional Equity
Applies to: Students, All Employees, Contractors, Vendors, Visitors, Guests and Other Third Parties
Campus Applicability: All
Effective Date: June 9, 2017
For More Information, Contact Office of Institutional Equity
Contact Information: (860) 486-2943 & (860) 679-3563
Official Website: http://www.equity.uconn.edu and http://www.accessibility.uconn.edu

Related Policies are:

Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment and Related Interpersonal Violence
Policy Statement: People with Disabilities

Related Documents are:

UCH Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals
Frequently Asked Questions

1. PURPOSE 

This policy provides the rules concerning individuals bringing animals on University property. This policy applies to all University campuses. Specific procedures regarding the presence of animals in UConn Health clinical practice and patient care areas are outlined in the UConn Health Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals.

2. LEGAL 

The Americans with Disabilities Act governs the use of service animals by individuals with disabilities. See 42 U.S.C. § 12101, et seq. The Fair Housing Act governs the use of emotional support animals (ESA’s) by individuals with disabilities in housing. See 42 U.S.C. § 3601, et seq. Connecticut state law regarding service animals may be found under C.G.S. § 46a-44.

3. DEFINITIONS

Controlled Space
For purposes of this policy, controlled spaces are not public spaces. Controlled spaces are defined as any indoor area owned or controlled by the University, and any outdoor area owned or controlled by the University with limitations on use or access (e.g., practice fields, stadiums, farm, tennis courts, etc.). Areas open to the public (i.e., streets, lawns, sidewalks, parking lots) with no limitations on access are not controlled spaces.

Handler
An individual with a disability who is the owner and user, or trainer of a service animal or ESA, or the owner or individual bringing an animal onto University property.

Emotional Support Animal (ESA)
Any animal specifically designated by a qualified medical provider that alleviates one or more identified symptoms of an individual’s disability. Such animal may afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling, workplace, or other area, provided there is a nexus between the individual’s disability and the assistance the animal provides. ESA’s are also commonly known as companion, therapeutic or assistance animals. ESA’s are not service animals.

Pet
For purposes of this policy, a pet is any animal that is not a service animal or ESA.

Public Spaces

For purposes of this policy, public spaces are indoor and outdoor areas that are open to the general public. Classrooms, residence halls and most employee workspaces are not generally considered public spaces.

Service Animal
Any dog specifically trained to perform a task for the benefit of an individual with a disability. In some circumstances, a miniature horse may be considered a service animal. The tasks performed by a service animal must directly relate to the individual’s disability.
Service Animal in Training
For purposes of this policy, a service animal in training is a dog that is being trained as a service animal and includes a puppy that is being raised to become a service animal in training.

University Property
For purposes of this policy, University property includes all areas owned or controlled by the University.

4. APPLICABILITY

This policy applies to all individuals bringing an animal on University property.

5. POLICY

5.1 Prohibition
All individuals are generally prohibited from bringing animals into any buildings or other controlled spaces on University property. However, individuals with disabilities are allowed to bring service animals and ESA’s on and/or into controlled spaces as provided below. In addition, faculty and staff are permitted to have pets in University-owned residential housing only to the extent permitted by the lease governing their rental agreement.  Exceptions for individuals in residence halls may be made in the sole discretion of the Executive Director of Residential Life or designee for exigent circumstances or other good cause shown consistent with the spirit and intent of this policy.
5.2 Service Animals
The University welcomes the presence of service animals assisting people with disabilities on its campuses consistent with the provisions of this policy and applicable law. A service animal is generally permitted to be on University property in any place where the animal’s handler is permitted to be. In certain limited situations, a service animal may be prohibited for safety and health reasons. The accompaniment of an individual with a disability by a service animal in a location with health and safety restrictions will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the appropriate department representative(s) in collaboration with the Department of Human Resources and/or the Center for Students with Disabilities.

Members of the University community, are prohibited from interfering in any way with a service animal, or the duties it performs.

5.3 Service Animals in Training
Connecticut law entitles any individual training a service animal to enter public spaces. A service animal in training is not allowed in controlled spaces including classrooms, residence halls and employee work areas. The individual training a service animal must be authorized to engage in designated training activities by a service animal organization or an individual who volunteers for a service animal organization that authorizes such volunteers to raise dogs to become service animals.  Individuals training a service animal must carry photographic identification indicating authorization to train the animal. A service animal in training, including a puppy that is being raised to become a service animal in training, must be identified with either tags, ear tattoos, identifying bandanas (on puppies), identifying coats (on adult dogs), or leashes and collars.

5.4 Emotional Support Animals (ESA’s)
An approved ESA owned by an individual who lives in University housing is permitted within the individual’s privately assigned living accommodations. An ESA  outside the private individual living accommodations must be in an animal carrier or controlled by a leash or harness.  ESA’s are not allowed in any other controlled spaces without advance permission. ESA’s are permitted to be in outdoor public areas to the same extent as pets.

An ESA owned by an individual employed by the University may be permitted within the individual’s workplace as an accommodation for a disability, but must be approved in advance by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Case Manager at the Department of Human Resources as outlined in Section 6.1 below.

5.5 Pets
Pets generally are not permitted in or on any controlled space on University property, and are permitted only in outdoor areas open to the general public.

5.6 Handler’ Responsibilities
5.6.1 A service animal, service animal in training, ESA or pet must be supervised directly by the handler, and the handler must retain full control of the animal at all times while on University property. The animal must be in an animal carrier or controlled by a harness, leash or tether, unless these devices interfere with the animal’s work, the individual’s disability prevents using these devices, or the animal is an ESA within the handler’s own dwelling. In those cases, the handler must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls.

5.6.2 Animals may not be left unattended at any time on University property, except for service animals left in the handler’s University residence or private office space or ESA’s left in the handler’s dwelling unit.  The service animal or ESA may be left unattended only for reasonable periods of time, as determined by the appropriate University staff based on the totality of the circumstances. The University may request impoundment of an ESA or service animal left for longer than a reasonable period of time. Owners of impounded animals will be held responsible for payment of any impound and/or license fees required to secure the release of their animals.

5.6.3 A handler who leaves his or her service animal or ESA unattended for longer than a reasonable period of time will receive one warning, and if the behavior occurs a second time, the University reserves the right to require the handler to remove the animal from campus and to prohibit the animal from being permitted back onto University property.

5.6.4 All handlers are responsible for compliance with state and local laws concerning animals (including registration, vaccinations, and tags), for controlling their animals, for cleaning up any waste created by the animal, and for any damage caused by the animal to individuals or property while on University property.

6. PROCEDURES

Specific procedures regarding the presence of animals in UConn Health clinical practice and patient care areas are outlined in the UConn Health Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals.

6.1 Employees Requesting Permission for Service Animals or ESA’s

6.1.1 Workplace Accommodation

Employees and all others performing work for the University who seek the presence of a service animal or an ESA as a workplace accommodation must contact the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Case Manager at the Department of Human Resources in advance of reporting for work with the animal. For service animals, the individual may be asked whether the animal is needed because of a disability, and what work or task(s) the animal has been trained to perform.

For ESA’s, the ADA Case Manager will determine whether the request represents a reasonable accommodation for a documented disability. The terms of the approval, including where the ESA will and will not be permitted, will be determined and documented by the ADA Case Manager, after the facilitation of an interactive accommodations process with the employee and their supervisor(s). This process must occur before any employee can bring an ESA into the workplace. The ADA Case Manager may be contacted at (860) 486-2036 or hr@uconn.edu. Information related to the ADA accommodations process for employees, is contained online: http://hr.uconn.edu/ada-compliance/.

UConn Health employees must contact the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) in advance of reporting for work with the animal. OIE may be contacted at (860) 679-3563 or equity@uconn.edu.  Information related to the ADA accommodations process for UCH employees is contained online: http://equity.uconn.edu/accessibility/


6.1.2. Residential Accommodation

Employees who reside on University property and who wish to have an ESA in their University housing as an accommodation for a disability must request the University’s permission to have the ESA in University housing. Permission will be granted only as an accommodation for a documented disability and must be arranged through the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Case Manager at the Department of Human Resources prior to bringing the animal into University housing. The ADA Case Manager will determine whether the request represents a reasonable accommodation for a documented disability and should be granted.

The employee is not allowed to take an ESA into any other controlled spaces, including but not limited to the employee’s work area, unless the employee has received express authorization to do so from the University. The ADA Case Manager may be contacted at (860) 486-2036 or hr@uconn.edu. Information related to the ADA accommodations process for employees is contained online: http://hr.uconn.edu/ada-compliance/.


6.2 Students Requesting Permission for Service Animals or ESA’s

6.2.1. Service Animals
Students are not required to receive permission from the University prior to bringing a service animal onto University property. The student may be asked whether the animal is needed because of a disability, and what work or task(s) the animal has been trained to perform.

If a student with a service animal plans to reside on campus, the student must notify the University of the need for a service animal’s presence in advance of beginning residence on University property with the animal. Such notification allows the University to make appropriate arrangements, offer any necessary assistance prior to the student’s arrival on campus, and to notify Public Safety of the animal’s presence in case of an emergency. Students should contact Residential Life prior to bringing the animal into their housing at livingoncampus@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2926. Students may also visit http://www.reslife.uconn.edu for further information.

If a student needs any other accommodations while attending the University, documentation of the disability and a request for accommodations must be made under the procedures found at http://www.csd.uconn.edu.  Students may also visit the Center for Students with Disabilities in Wilbur Cross, Room 204, or contact (860) 486-2020 or email csd@uconn.edu for further information related to accommodations.

UConn Health students may contact the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) for any questions related to service animals, ESA’s, or more generally related to accommodations.  OIE may be contacted at (860) 679-3563 or equity@uconn.edu.


6.2.2. Emotional Support Animals (ESA’s)
Permission to have an ESA may be granted only as an accommodation for a documented disability and must be arranged in advance through the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD). CSD will determine whether the request represents a reasonable accommodation for a documented disability and should be granted. In making that determination, CSD (in connection with Residential Life for those students residing in residence halls), will consider:

  • The size of the animal
  • Whether the animal’s presence would force another individual from that individual’s housing (e.g., serious allergies)
  • Whether the animal’s presence would violate individuals’ rights to peace and quiet enjoyment
  • Whether the animal is housebroken or able to live with others
  • Direct threat (currently or in the past) to the individual or others
  • Past excessive damage to housing caused by the animal

A request for an accommodation must be made under the procedures found at http://www.csd.uconn.edu.  Students may also visit the Center for Students with Disabilities in Wilbur Cross, Room 204, or contact (860) 486-2020 or email csd@uconn.edu.

If approved, a student must have advance communication with Residential Life prior to bringing the animal into their housing. Students may contact Residential Life at livingoncampus@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2926. Students may also visit http://www.reslife.uconn.edu.

Students are not allowed to take ESA’s in or on any controlled spaces other than their privately assigned living accommodations without specific advance authorization from CSD.  ESA’s cannot be left overnight in University housing to be cared for by anyone other than the handler absent permission from Residential Life. The handler must clean up after the animal, ensure that the animal does not disturb the peace and quiet enjoyment of others, and otherwise ensure that the animal is well cared for.

6.3 Visitors
Visitors are not required to receive permission from the University prior to bringing a service animal onto University property. The visitor may be asked whether the animal is needed because of a disability, and what work or task(s) the animal has been trained to perform.

A visitor may contact the Office of Institutional Equity at equity@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2943 (Storrs and Regional Campuses); (860) 679-3563 (UConn Health) in advance if the visitor has any questions about the rules concerning the presence of a service animal or a service animal in training (as outlined in Section 5.3) at a specific event or in a specific location on campus.

7.  Appeals and Grievances
Any individual who feels that he or she has been unfairly denied the ability to bring or maintain an animal on University property, may contact the Office of Institutional Equity at equity@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2943 (Storrs and Regional Campuses); (860) 679-3563 (UConn Health) or refer to http://www.equity.uconn.edu  for further information.

8. Violations of Policy / Removal of Animal / Disruptive Animals
Access to University property may be restricted or revoked under the circumstances outlined below. Restrictions or exclusions will be considered on a case-by-case basis. The University reserves the right to remove or exclude an approved animal from University property if:

  1. The animal poses a direct threat to health and safety
  2. The handler does not maintain control of the animal, including but not limited to during any interactions with other animals
  3. The presence of an animal fundamentally alters a University program
  4. Improper/Inadequate care of the animal is exhibited, including if the animal is not housebroken
  5. Damage or harm is caused by the animal
  6. The handler violates any of the responsibilities as outlined in Section 5.6 of this policy

If the presence of an animal poses a direct threat to the health and safety of others, the University reserves the right to remove or exclude an animal from University property. In such a situation, Public Safety may be contacted to assist in the removal of the animal. In particular, if a handler’s animal is disruptive in the classroom, the instructor may ask the handler and their animal to leave the classroom immediately. If a handler’s animal is disruptive in the workplace, the handler’s supervisor may ask the handler and their animal to leave the workspace immediately. If a handler’s animal is disruptive at a University event, the event organizer may ask the handler and their animal to leave the event immediately.

Questions about a disruptive animal should be directed to the following:

  • Center for Students with Disabilities (animals in the classroom):
  • Department of Human Resources (animals in the workplace):
    • Contact (860) 486-2036 or email hr@uconn.edu
    • UConn Health HR Contact: (860) 679-2426
  • UConn Health Contact (animals in practice areas, including JDH):
    • Contact appropriate medical staff (i.e. Supervisor or Nursing Manager)
  • Residential Life (animals in the residence halls):
  • Office of Institutional Equity (all other questions, including regarding visitors)
    • Contact (860) 486-2943 (Storrs and Regional Campuses); (860) 679-3563 (UConn Health) or email equity@uconn.edu

9. Exclusions

This policy does not apply to:

  • Fish in aquariums no larger than ten gallons as follows:
    • Within University housing, such aquariums are allowed without advance notice or permission;
    • Within employee workspaces, such aquariums are allowed only with the express advance, written authorization of the handler’s manager/supervisor. At any time, a manager may revoke approval for such an aquarium, requiring its immediate removal from the workspace; and
    • The handler has responsibility for maintaining the aquarium in a clean and sanitary manner and for any damage caused by the aquarium. Animals other than fish are not allowed in such aquariums;
  • University-maintained fish in aquariums of any size located in waiting rooms or other public areas of UConn Health facilities and maintained by UConn Health, including John Dempsey Hospital and University Medical Group;
  • Animals used in Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approved University research, education or testing Animals used in classes on campus, based on requests by faculty for such use. Such requests may be granted only upon showing that the presence of the animal is for a bona fide educational purpose, and such purpose is clearly delineated on the course syllabus as a central topic in class.  Prior permission must be obtained from the academic unit head, the dean and/or the Provost’s Office and the IACUC;
  • Requests for the presence of animals within controlled spaces for non-educational purposes must be fully reviewed and approved by the Provost’s Office or the Vice President of Student Affairs, or their designees. Such requests may be approved only upon a showing that there exists a well-developed program with defined parameters, to be administered by appropriately trained staff;
  • Animals used in police, search and rescue operations on University property;
  • Animals trained for and used in a clinical therapeutic setting on campus, such as a counseling center;
  • Appearances by the official mascot of the University and/or official mascots of other institutions as approved by event organizers; and
  • Animals accompanying individuals in clinical practice or patient care areas at UConn Health pursuant to the UConn Health Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals.

Any questions pertaining to this policy may be addressed to the Office of Institutional Equity at equity@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2943.

 

Protection of Minors and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect Policy

Title: Protection of Minors and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect
Policy Owner: Office of Audit, Compliance & Ethics
Applies to: All personnel associated with the University including faculty, staff, volunteers, graduate and undergraduate students, interns, residents and fellows.
Campus Applicability: All University campuses including Storrs, regional campuses, the Law School and UConn Health (University)
Effective Date: April 1, 2016
For More Information, Contact Minor Protection Coordinator/Office of Audit, Compliance & Ethics
Contact Information: (860) 486-5682
Official Website: http://minorprotection.uconn.edu

1.  Reason for Policy

The University of Connecticut is committed to promoting a high quality, secure and safe environment for minors who are active in the University community. This policy and the accompanying procedures establish consistent standards intended to support the University in meeting its commitments to promote the protection of minors who participate in activities sponsored by the University and to inform all members of the University community of their obligation to report any instances of known or suspected child abuse or neglect.

2.  Applies to

This policy applies to all University employees, including faculty, staff, volunteers, graduate and undergraduate students, interns, residents and fellows. Except as provided below, it also applies to any activity that takes place on University property or is sponsored by the University and is open to the participation of minors.

This policy does not apply to: (1) events open to the public where parents/guardians or adult chaperones are invited / expected to accompany and supervise their children; (2) undergraduate and graduate programs in which minors are enrolled for academic credit or have been accepted for enrollment; (3) students who are dually enrolled in University credit-bearing courses while also enrolled in elementary, middle, and/or high school, UNLESS such enrollment includes overnight housing in University facilities; (4) minors employed by the University; (5) field trips or visits solely supervised by a minor’s school or organization; (6) patient-care related activities relating to minors; (7) non-university programs undertaking activities in or on University land or facilities under the sole supervision of said program; (8) university programs which take place outside of the University under the supervision of a separate organization; (9) licensed child care facilities; and (10) other activities granted advance and written exemption from part or all of the policy.

3.  Definitions

A. Authorized Adult: A University employee, student, or volunteer (paid or unpaid) who has (1) successfully passed a Background Screening within the last four years, (2) completed the University minor’s protection training within the last year, and (3) has been registered with the University’s Minor Protection Coordinator.

B. University Sponsored Activities Involving Minors: A program or activity open to the participation of minors that is sponsored, operated, or supported by the University and where minors, who are not enrolled or accepted for enrollment in credit-granting courses at the University or who are not an employee of the University, are under the supervision of the University or its representatives.

C. Background Screening: A criminal history search that is consistent with University Criminal Background Check Policies, which has been successfully completed within the past four years. Such investigation may include the following searches by a nationally recognized background check vendor:

i.    Social Security Number verification/past address trace;

ii.   federal criminal history record search for felony and misdemeanor convictions covering, at minimum, the last seven years in all states lived in;

iii.   a statewide or county level criminal history record search for felony and misdemeanor convictions covering, at minimum, the last seven years in all states lived in; an;

iv.   sex offender registry searches at the county level in every jurisdiction where the candidate currently resides or has resided.

D. Child Abuse: A non-accidental physical injury to a minor, or an injury that is inconsistent with the history given of it, or a condition resulting in maltreatment, such as, but not limited to, malnutrition, sexual molestation or exploitation, deprivation of necessities, emotional maltreatment, or cruel punishment.

E. Child Neglect: The abandonment or denial of proper care and attention (physically, emotionally, or morally) of a minor, or the permitting of a minor to live under conditions, circumstances, or associations injurious to the minor’s well-being. (Connecticut General Statutes § 46b-120(6))

F. Minor: Any individual under the age of 18, who has not been legally emancipated.

G. Mandated Reporter: An individual designated under Section 17a-101(b) of the Connecticut General Statutes as someone who is required to report or cause a report to be made of Child Abuse or Child Neglect. All employees of the University, except student employees, are Mandated Reporters under state law.

H. Minor Protection Coordinator: An individual designated by the University to develop procedures to implement this policy and best practices for the protection of minors involved in University Sponsored activities involving minors , and to provide coordination, training, and monitoring in order to promote the effective implementation of this policy.

4.  Reporting Child Abuse or Neglect

Pursuant to state law, all University employees (except student employees) are Mandated Reporters of Child Abuse and/or Child Neglect and must comply with the reporting requirements in Connecticut’s mandated reporting laws. (Connecticut General Statutes Sections 17a-101a to 17a-101d)

Connecticut state law, requires that reports of known or suspected child abuse or neglect be made orally, as soon as possible, but no later than 12 hours to law enforcement or the Department of Children and Families (DCF), and followed up in writing within 48 hours.

DCF’s 24-hour hotline for reporting suspected Child Abuse or Child Neglect is (800) 842-2288, and additional guidance on these reporting requirements may be found here: http://www.ct.gov/dcf/cwp/view.asp?a=2556&Q=314384. (Last accessed 2/11/2016.)

University employees are protected under state law for the good faith reporting of suspected Child Abuse or Child Neglect, even if a later investigation fails to substantiate the allegations.

In addition to this statutory reporting requirement, University employees must also comply with any other University policies that impose additional reporting obligations, such as the Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Related Interpersonal Violence.

5.  Requirements for University Sponsored Activities Involving Minors

To better protect minors participating in activities sponsored by the University, all Programs must meet the following requirements, in addition to any applicable federal, state, or local law, and University policies. Please Note: A more comprehensive description of the following requirements are detailed in the accompanying procedures.

A.   University Sponsored activities involving minors must register with the University’s Minor Protection Coordinator with sufficient advance notice to confirm the requirements of this policy have been met.

B.   No individual, paid or unpaid, shall be allowed to supervise, chaperone, or otherwise oversee any Minor who participates in University Sponsored activities involving minors unless he or she is an Authorized Adult.

C. All University Sponsored activities involving minors must implement standards to safeguard the welfare of participating minors, and must also comply with University standards included in the accompanying procedures.

D. All University Sponsored activities involving minors are subject to periodic audits to verify compliance with this policy and the accompanying procedures.

E. Any exceptions must be requested with sufficient notice and approved in writing by the Minor Protection Coordinator in consultation with Minor Protection Oversight Committee prior to the start of program operations.

6.  Enforcement

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for All University Employees, applicable collective bargaining agreements, and applicable Student Code.

Policy History

Policy Created: April 1, 2016 [Approved by the President’s Cabinet]

Procedures

Procedures for the Protection of Minors and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect can be found at: http://minorprotection.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1652/2016/03/Procedures-for-the-Protection-of-Minors-and-Reporting-of-Child-Abuse-and-Neglect.pdf. 

Contractor Parking Policy

Title: Contractor Parking Policy
Policy Owner: Planning Architectural & Engineering Services and Parking Services
Applies to: Contractors, Construction Managers and Workers
Campus Applicability: Storrs and Depot Campuses
Effective Date: January 2016
For More Information, Contact Parking Services
Contact Information: (860) 486-4930
Official Website: park.uconn.edu

Reason for Policy

Parking capacity on UConn’s Storrs campus is very limited and highly demanded.  Parking privileges on the Storrs campus must therefore be judiciously allocated among institutional stakeholders and contractors to maximize the benefits to each.

Applies to

This policy applies to all general and trade contractors, construction managers, trucking and delivery drivers and workers while conducting University-contracted business at the Storrs and Depot Campuses.

DEFINITIONS OF VEHICLE TYPES

Personal Vehicle

A personal (or worker) vehicle is one that is owned by an individual and primarily used to transport an individual or a group of individuals to and from a worksite or place of employment.

Contractor Vehicle

A contractor vehicle is one that is owned by a business and is primarily used for business.  Examples of contractor vehicles include pick-up trucks, work vans or company cars upon which the business identification is permanently displayed.

Construction Equipment

Construction equipment is a vehicle that is owned, leased or rented by a University-contracted business primarily for use on a construction site to perform specific construction work or specific construction activity.  Examples of construction equipment include cranes, mobile cranes, backhoes, front-loaders and rollers.

Construction Delivery Vehicles

A delivery vehicle is one that is primarily used to transport materials or personnel to or from a worksite. Examples of delivery vehicles include dump trucks, tractor trailers, flatbed trailers and shuttles.

GENERAL PARKING POLICIES

All contractor or personal vehicles that are parked at the University of Connecticut’s Storrs campus, Mansfield Depot campus, Bergin Property or any other University property are required to obtain and conspicuously display a University parking permit.  Parking permits and their associated parking privileges are specifically issued either to an individual worker or a contractor.  Although those parking privileges are for the assigned holder, the physical permits may be moved between vehicles and may be used either by the assigned permit holder or a designee.  Any vehicle that does not display a valid parking permit will be subject to ticketing and/or towing at the vehicle owner’s expense.  Egregious or repeated parking policy violations can also lead to the suspension, withdrawal or withholding of parking permits and privileges at the University’s sole discretion.  Parking by contractors or workers at the North Garage or South Garage, or overnight parking of personal or contractor vehicles on University property is prohibited, unless previously approved by the University Representative in conjunction with Parking Services.

Location of Parking for Workers

During the University’s academic year, from mid-August to mid-May, workers can request and receive parking permits for personal vehicles in designated parking areas on the Mansfield Depot campus and the Bergin Property.  These two locations are located on State Route 44 and are approximately two miles from the main Storrs campus.  Parking permits that authorize parking on the Mansfield Depot campus and Bergin Property will be issued to contractors and workers at no-charge and may be used in personal or contractor vehicles.  Parking permits are issued on a space-available and first-come, first-served basis.  There is no personal vehicle parking on the main Storrs campus for workers during the University’s academic year, except as specified herein.

During the University’s summer term (mid-May to mid-August), workers can request and receive no-charge parking permits for personal vehicles at designated parking lots at the perimeter of the main Storrs campus on a space available basis.  University Parking Services will assign separate and distinct contractor parking permits based on availability at locations in closer proximity to worksites, most typically on student parking lots such as Lots C, W and X.

Permitting Process

All parking permits can be obtained at the University’s Parking Services office located at 3 Discovery Drive in Storrs, CT.  The Parking Services office is open on all non-holiday business days, typically from 8am to 4:30pm.  Parking Services can be reached by telephone at (860) 486-4930 and by email sent to parkingservices@uconn.edu.

In order to obtain a parking permit, the University requires a valid driver’s license, current vehicle registration and proof of automobile insurance.  Parking permits are issued for a fixed term and any associated fees must be paid at the time of permit issuance.  Parking permits provided free of charge or purchased are typically issued for periods of one or more months, one or two semesters, or for one year (12 months).  Each calendar year is divided into three semesters: Spring semester (January – May), Fall semester (August-December), and Summer semester (June – August).  An expiration date for all University parking permits are established at the time of their issuance.  Permit holders are responsible for obtaining new parking permits prior to their expiry date when the extension of their privileges is needed.

An administrative Lost Permit fee of $20 must be paid before a replacement will be issued.  The fee will be incurred whenever a lost permit is replaced and irrespective of its original purchase price.  The lost permit will be expired before its replacement is issued and cannot be reused if it is subsequently found.  If a permit that is reported as lost is found to be in use, it will be considered stolen and the University will act accordingly.

Transportation

It is the workers and/or the Contractor’s responsibility to arrange for transportation between the parking areas and the worksites when needed.  Use of the University shuttle bus system by workers for daily transportation is prohibited.

The Contractor may provide shuttle services for workers if it deems it necessary or desirable.  Shuttles shall not be parked on University property overnight unless there is prior approval from the University Representative in conjunction with Parking Services and the daytime shuttle bus parking location, whether operating or unattended, must have prior approval from the University Representative in conjunction with Parking Services.

Perimeter Lot Parking During the Academic Year

Contractors may request parking for personal or contractor vehicles in closer proximity to the worksite on a perimeter student parking lot during the academic year for the fee of $50.00 per month, payable in advance of the permit issuance.  These types of permits may be purchased for up to a six month period.  Perimeter lot parking permits are subject to availability and provide parking only on the specified lot.  These exceptional requests will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and decisions will be predicated on factors related both to the project and the efficient operation of the University’s parking system.

Day Permits

Construction workers or contractors who are only on worksites infrequently may request day parking permit for their personal or contractor vehicles.  Infrequent is defined as coming to campus no more than once a week.  The cost of a day parking permit is $12.00 per day, payable in advance of the permit issuance.  Day parking permits authorize parking in a specific parking lot and will be issued on a space-available basis.   Day parking permits generally authorize parking in close proximity to the worksite when possible and their privileges may include specific University employee and/or student parking locations.  At the University’s discretion, day permit issuance may be suspended to any Contractor should the Worker or Company request a day permit more frequently than what is permitted.

Limits of Liability 

Workers and Contractors with parking permits should recognize that the lighting in parking lots varies greatly between locations, and that the permit holder accepts the conditions of the lots in “as is” condition.  The University provides no security in the parking lots and makes no representations regarding the security of the premises.  All Workers and Contractors park and use the lots at their own risk and the University is not responsible for any damages or theft that occur to vehicles or persons while utilizing the parking permits or lots.    The Contractor and/or Worker shall be responsible for any damage or harm it causes to others or to the property of others and for any damage it causes to University property (excepting normal wear and tear from use of the parking lots.

SITE-SPECIFIC PARKING POLICIES

Parking of Vehicles inside the Perimeter of a Worksite

The University understands that a certain number of vehicles are required on worksites in order to conduct the work.  However, the University does not support and will actively work to prevent oversizing the perimeter of a worksite in order to accommodate daily worker parking inside the worksite.  This is particularly true when a project’s site logistics plans specify the use or loss of University parking capacity.  The parking of personal vehicles on a worksite is highly discouraged, and only contractor vehicles, construction equipment and delivery vehicles should be on the worksite.

Construction equipment parked on the worksite does not require a parking permit.  If not in use, the long-term storage of construction equipment on worksites or University property without specific written permission by the University representative and Parking Services is prohibited.  Construction equipment is expected to remain on the designated worksite within the perimeter of the worksite.

Contractor vehicles making occasional or periodic material deliveries or being used in conjunction with specific work on the worksite do not require a parking permit when they are idle within the perimeter of a worksite.  Parking permits must be displayed in delivery vehicles used to transport materials to a worksite if they require parking outside the perimeter of the worksite after unloading.

Parking of Vehicles at Construction Field Offices

For each worksite, the primary general contractor or construction manager may request up to three (3) worksite parking permits for contractor vehicles to park at construction trailers.  There is no cost for these three (3) worksite parking permits and these permits allow the parking of contractor vehicles for administration of the project.  The three worksite parking permits are intended to satisfy the needs of the contractors and subcontractors combined on most projects.

For large projects, the general contractor or construction manager may need additional worksite parking permits for contractor vehicles associated with the administration of a project.  These additional contractor vehicles are intended to be situated adjacent to a project field office.  Requests for additional permits will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the University Representative in conjunction with Parking Services.  Additional contractor parking permits will be issued at the sole discretion of the University.  If any additional worksite parking permits (beyond the above-mentioned three no-charge contractor permits) are approved for parking contractor vehicles adjacent to field offices (or elsewhere as authorized by the University Representative and Parking Services), each permit will cost $50.00/month, payable in advance of their issuance. When bidding work, Contractor shall not assume such increase in allowable worksite parking permits will be granted.

Worksite Logistics Considerations

When reviewing the site logistics for a project, and determining the perimeter of a worksite, non-construction equipment parking capacity should be excluded or minimized to the extent possible.  The use of parking capacity for the long-term storage of material is strongly discouraged.  If any existing parking areas are to be utilized during construction, the contractor shall take photographs of the area prior to utilization and restore the areas to “like new” condition, including the parking surfaces, curbs, sidewalks, lawn, soil de-compaction, plantings and any other surrounding area or items that are damaged during use.

As a limited resource, the loss of parking can be disruptive on the University’s operations, and the effects on parking from construction activities must be planned for and mitigated.  Parking Services and the Transportation Planner must have the opportunity to review the site logistics plan prior to their finalization whenever the University’s parking access or capacity will be affected by a project.

The parking of personal vehicles at construction trailers without a worksite parking permit is prohibited.  The general contractor or construction manager may utilize its worksite parking permits for parking at worksite trailers if approved in advance as part of its site logistics plans.

Policy History

Effective January 2016 (approved by President’s Cabinet)

Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Related Interpersonal Violence

Including Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment, Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Complicity, Retaliation and Inappropriate Amorous Relationships

 

Title: Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Related Interpersonal Violence
Policy Owner: The Office of Institutional Equity
Applies to: Students, All Employees, Contractors, Vendors, Visitors, Guests and Other Third Parties
Campus Applicability: All
Effective Date: January 1, 2016
For More Information, Contact Office of Institutional Equity
Contact Information: (860) 486-2943 & (860) 679-3563
Official Website: http://www.equity.uconn.edu and http://titleix.uconn.edu/
A PDF, Printer Friendly copy of this policy is available at: http://policy.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/243/2016/07/2016-07-1-DiscHarassment.pdf
Related Documents:

CONTENTS

I.     STATEMENT OF POLICY

II.   TO WHOM THIS POLICY APPLIES

III. APPLICABLE PROCEDURES UNDER THIS POLICY

  1. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A STUDENT
  2. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS AN EMPLOYEE
  3. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS BOTH A STUDENT AND AN EMPLOYEE
  4. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A THIRD PARTY
  5. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A UCH STUDENT, EMPLOYEE OR THIRD PARTY

IV. TITLE IX COORDINATOR

V. UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY

VI.EMPLOYEE REPORTING RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. TITLE IX REPORTING OBLIGATIONS
  2. CLERY REPORTING OBLIGATIONS
  3. CHILD ABUSE REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

VII.    COMPLAINANT OPTIONS FOR REPORTING PROHIBITED CONDUCT

  1. REPORTING TO LAW ENFORCEMENT
  2. REPORTING TO THE UNIVERSITY

VIII.   ACCESSING CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

  1. REMEDIAL AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES
  2. INTERIM ACTIONS

IX. PROHIBITED CONDUCT UNDER THIS POLICY

  1. DISCRIMINATION
  2. DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT
  3. SEXUAL OR GENDER-BASED HARASSMENT
  4. SEXUAL ASSAULT
  5. SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
  6. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE
  7. STALKING
  8. RETALIATION
  9. COMPLICITY

X. INAPPROPRIATE AMOROUS RELATIONSHIPS

  1. INSTRUCTIONAL/STUDENT CONTEXT
  2. EMPLOYMENT CONTEXT

XI. PREVENTION, AWARENESS AND TRAINING PROGRAMS

XII.    OBLIGATION TO PROVIDE TRUTHFUL INFORMATION

XIII.   RELATED POLICIES

  1. STUDENTS
  2. EMPLOYEES

XIV.   POLICY REVIEW

I. STATEMENT OF POLICY

The University of Connecticut (the “University”) is committed to maintaining a safe and non-discriminatory learning, living and working environment for all members of the University community – students, employees, and visitors.  Academic and professional excellence can exist only when each member of our community is assured an atmosphere of safety and mutual respect.  All members of the University community are responsible for the maintenance of an environment in which people are free to learn and work without fear of discrimination, discriminatory harassment or interpersonal violence.  Discrimination diminishes individual dignity and impedes equal employment and educational opportunities.

The University does not unlawfully discriminate in any of its education or employment programs and activities on the basis of an individual’s race, color, ethnicity, religious creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, genetic information, physical or mental disability (including learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and past or present history of mental illness), veteran’s status, prior conviction of a crime, workplace hazards to the reproductive system, gender identity or expression, or membership in any other protected classes as set forth in state or federal law.  To that end, this Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment and Related Interpersonal Violence, Including Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment, Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Complicity, Retaliation and Inappropriate Amorous Relationships (the “Policy”) prohibits specific forms of behavior that violate state and federal laws, including but not limited to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”), the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (“VAWA”), and related state and federal anti-discrimination laws. Such behavior may also require the University to fulfill certain reporting obligations under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (the “Clery Act”), as amended by VAWA, and Connecticut state law regarding reporting suspected child abuse and neglect.

The University prohibits discrimination, as well as discriminatory harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence, stalking, sexual or gender-based harassment, complicity in the commission of any act prohibited by this Policy, retaliation against a person for the good faith reporting of any of these forms of conduct or participation in any investigation or proceeding under this Policy (collectively, “Prohibited Conduct”[1]).  These forms of Prohibited Conduct are unlawful and undermine the mission and values of our academic community. In addition, inappropriate amorous relationships with employees in positions of authority can undermine the University’s mission when those in positions of authority abuse or appear to abuse their authority.

The University adopts this Policy with a commitment to: (1) eliminating, preventing, and addressing the effects of Prohibited Conduct; (2) fostering a safe and respectful University community; (3) cultivating a climate where all individuals are well-informed and supported in reporting Prohibited Conduct; (4) providing a fair and impartial process for all parties in the investigation and resolution of such reports; and (5) identifying the standards by which violations of this Policy will be evaluated and disciplinary action may be imposed. In addition, the University conducts ongoing prevention, awareness, and training programs for employees and students to facilitate the goals of this Policy.

A student or employee determined by the University to have committed an act of Prohibited Conduct is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including separation from the University. Third Parties who commit acts of Prohibited Conduct may have their relationships with the University terminated and/or their privileges of being on University premises withdrawn.

It is the responsibility of every member of the University community to foster an environment free of Prohibited Conduct. All members of the University community are encouraged to take reasonable and prudent actions to prevent or stop an act of Prohibited Conduct. The University will support and assist community members who take such actions.

Retaliation against any individual who, in good faith, reports or participates in the reporting, investigation, or adjudication of Prohibited Conduct is strictly forbidden.

This Policy applies to all reports of Prohibited Conduct occurring on or after the effective date of this Policy. Where the date of the Prohibited Conduct precedes the effective date of this Policy, the definitions of misconduct in effect at the time of the alleged incident(s) will be used. The procedures under this Policy, however, will be used to investigate and resolve all reports made on or after the effective date of this Policy, regardless of when the incident(s) occurred.

II.   TO WHOM THIS POLICY APPLIES

This Policy applies to: students as defined in UConn’s Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code (“Students”); University employees, consisting of all full-time and part-time faculty, University Staff (including special payroll employees), UConn Health employees, professional research staff, and post-doctoral fellows (“Employees”); and contractors, vendors, visitors, guests or other third parties (“Third Parties”). This Policy pertains to acts of Prohibited Conduct committed by or against Students, Employees and Third Parties when:

  1. the conduct occurs on campus or other property owned or controlled by the University;
  1. the conduct occurs in the context of a University employment or education program or activity, including, but not limited to, University-sponsored study abroad, research, on-line, or internship programs; or
  1. the conduct occurs outside the context of a University employment or education program or activity, but has continuing adverse effects on or creates a hostile environment for Students, Employees or Third Parties while on campus or other property owned or controlled by the University or in any University employment or education program or activity.

III.  APPLICABLE PROCEDURES UNDER THIS POLICY

The specific procedures for reporting, investigating, and resolving Prohibited Conduct are based upon the nature of the respondent’s relationship to the University (Student, Employee, or Third Party). Each set of procedures referenced below is guided by the same principles of fairness and respect for complainants and respondents. “Complainant” means the individual who presents as the victim of any Prohibited Conduct under this Policy, regardless of whether that person makes a report or seeks action under this Policy.[2] “Respondent” means the individual who has been accused of violating this Policy.

The procedures referenced below provide for prompt and equitable response to reports of Prohibited Conduct. The procedures designate specific timeframes for major stages of the process, provide for thorough and impartial investigations that afford the Complainant and Respondent notice and an opportunity to present witnesses and evidence, and assure equal and timely access to the information that will be used in determining whether a Policy violation has occurred. The University applies the Preponderance of the Evidence standard when determining whether this Policy has been violated. “Preponderance of the Evidence” means that it is more likely than not that a Policy violation occurred.

A. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A STUDENT

The procedures for responding to reports of Prohibited Conduct committed by Students are detailed in Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code (“Student Code”) (http://community.uconn.edu/the-student-code-preamble/).

B.  WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS AN EMPLOYEE

The procedures for responding to reports of Prohibited Conduct committed by Employees are detailed in OIE’s Complaint Processes (http://www.equity.uconn.edu/discrimination/complaint-procedures/).

C.  WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS BOTH A STUDENT AND AN EMPLOYEE

  • The Student-Respondent procedures will apply if the Respondent’s primary status is as a Student;
  • The Employee-Respondent procedures will apply if the Respondent’s primary status is as an Employee.
  • If there is a question as to the predominant role of the Respondent, the University will determine which of the procedures applies based on the facts and circumstances (such as which role predominates in the context of the Prohibited Conduct). The Student-Respondent procedures typically will apply to graduate students except in those cases where the graduate student’s assistantship role predominated in the context of the Prohibited Conduct. Further, where a Respondent is both a Student and an Employee (including but not limited to graduate students), the Respondent may be subject to any of the sanctions applicable to Students or Employees.

D. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A THIRD PARTY
The University’s ability to take appropriate corrective action against a Third Party will be determined by the nature of the relationship of the Third Party to the University. The University will determine the appropriate manner of resolution consistent with the University’s commitment to a prompt and equitable process under federal law, federal guidance, and this Policy.

E. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A UCONN HEALTH STUDENT, EMPLOYEE OR THIRD PARTY Parties should contact the UConn Health Office of Institutional Equity by calling (860) 679-3563 or email: equity@uconn.edu.

IV.  TITLE IX COORDINATOR

Under Title IX:

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.

The Title IX Coordinator is charged with monitoring the University’s compliance with Title IX, ensuring appropriate education and training, coordinating the University’s investigation, response, and resolution of all reports under this Policy and ensuring appropriate actions to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects. The Office of Institutional Equity oversees reports involving Students, Employees and Third Parties.  The University has also designated Deputy Title IX Coordinators who may assist the Title IX Coordinator in the discharge of these responsibilities. The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators receive ongoing appropriate training to discharge their responsibilities.

Concerns about the University’s application of Title IX may be addressed to the Title IX Coordinator.  Additionally, concerns about the University’s application of Title VII and/or other federal and state anti-discrimination laws may be addressed to the Office of Institutional Equity.

The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators can be contacted by telephone, email, or in person during regular office hours:

Elizabeth A. Conklin
Associate Vice President, Office of Institutional Equity
Title IX Coordinator
Wood Hall, First Floor
elizabeth.conklin@uconn.edu
(860) 486-2943

Sarah Chipman
Director of Investigations, Office of Institutional Equity
Deputy Title IX Coordinator
Wood Hall, First Floor
sarah.chipman@uconn.edu
(860) 486-2943

External reporting options include the United States Department of Education, Clery Act Compliance Team (at clery@ed.gov); the United States Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (at OCR@ed.gov or (800) 421-3481); the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (at info@eeoc.gov or (800) 669-4000); and/or the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities ((800)-477-5737).

V. UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY

The University is committed to protecting the privacy of all individuals involved in the investigation and resolution of a report under this Policy. The University also is committed to providing assistance to help Students, Employees and Third Parties make informed choices. With respect to any report under this Policy, the University will take reasonable efforts to protect the privacy of participants, in accordance with applicable state and federal law, while balancing the need to gather information to assess the report and to take steps to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects.

Privacy and confidentiality have distinct meanings under this Policy.

Privacy: Privacy means that information related to a report of Prohibited Conduct will be shared with a limited circle of University Employees who “need to know” in order to assist in support of the Complainant and in the assessment, investigation, and resolution of the report. All Employees who are involved in the University’s response to reports of Prohibited Conduct receive specific training and guidance about sharing and safeguarding private information in accordance with state and federal law.

The privacy of Student education records will be protected in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”), as outlined in the University’s FERPA policy.(http://policy.uconn.edu/2011/05/24/ferpa-policy/) The privacy of an individual’s medical and related records generally is protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) and/or state laws governing protection of medical records. Access to an Employee’s personnel records may be restricted in accordance with Connecticut law and applicable collective bargaining agreements.

Confidentiality: Confidentiality exists in the context of laws that protect certain relationships, including with medical and clinical care providers (and those who provide administrative services related to the provision of medical and clinical care), mental health providers, counselors, and ordained clergy, all of whom may engage in confidential communications under Connecticut law. The University has designated individuals who have the ability to have privileged communications as “Confidential Employees.” When information is shared by an individual with a Confidential Employee or a community professional with the same legal protections, the Confidential Employee (and/or such community professional) cannot reveal the information to any third party except where required or permitted by law. For example, information may be disclosed when: (i) the individual gives written consent for its disclosure; (ii) there is a concern that the individual will likely cause serious physical harm to self or others; or (iii) the information concerns conduct involving suspected abuse or neglect of a minor under the age of 18.

VI. EMPLOYEE REPORTING RESPONSIBILITIES

A.      TITLE IX REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

Most University employees are required to immediately report information about certain types of Prohibited Conduct involving any Student to the University’s Office of Institutional Equity.[3]  An Employee’s responsibility to report under this Policy is governed by his/her role at the University.  The University designates every Employee as either a Confidential Employee or a Responsible Employee.

Confidential Employee: Any Employee who is entitled under state law to have privileged communications.  Confidential Employees will not disclose information about Prohibited Conduct to the University without the permission of the Student or Employee (subject to the exceptions set forth in the Confidentiality section of this Policy). Confidential Employees at the University of Connecticut include:

      •  Student Health Services

      •  Counseling and Mental Health Services

      •  Employee Assistance Program

Responsible Employee: Any Employee who is not a Confidential Employee, and certain categories of student employees. Responsible Employees are required to immediately report to the University’s Office of Institutional Equity all relevant details (obtained directly or indirectly) about an incident of Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence and/or Stalking (as defined in Section IX, below) that involves any Student as a Complainant, Respondent, and/or witness, including dates, times, locations, and names of parties and witnesses. [4] Reporting is required when the Responsible Employee knows (by reason of a direct or indirect disclosure) or should have known of such Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, and/or Stalking.  Responsible Employees include (but are not necessarily limited to) Faculty and Staff, Resident Assistants, Graduate Teaching Assistants, Graduate Research Assistants, and any student-employees serving as Campus Security Authorities (CSAs) when disclosures are made to any of them in their capacities as Employees.  This manner of reporting may help inform the University of the general extent and nature of Prohibited Conduct on and off campus so the University can track patterns, evaluate the scope of the problem, and formulate appropriate campus-wide responses.

Responsible Employees are not required to report information disclosed (1) at public awareness events (e.g., “Take Back the Night,” candlelight vigils, protests, “survivor speak-outs” or other public forums in which Students may disclose incidents of Prohibited Conduct; collectively, “Public Awareness Events”); (2) during a Student’s participation as a subject in an Institutional Review Board-approved human subjects research protocol (“IRB Research”); or (3) as part of coursework submitted to an instructor  in connection with a course assignment.  Even in the absence of such obligation, all Employees are encouraged to contact the Title IX Coordinator if they become aware of information that suggests a safety risk to the University community or any member thereof. The University may provide information about Students’ Title IX and/or other civil rights and about available University and community resources and support at Public Awareness Events, however, and Institutional Review Boards may, in appropriate cases, require researchers to provide such information to all Student subjects of IRB Research.

Dean, Director, Department Head and Supervisor Responsibility to Report Prohibited Conduct Where Either the Complainant or the Respondent is an Employee.  Under this Policy, Deans, Directors, Department Heads and Supervisors are required to report to the Office of Institutional Equity all relevant details about an incident of Prohibited Conduct[5] where either the Complainant or the Respondent is an Employee.  Reporting is required when such Deans, Directors, Department Heads and Supervisors know (by reason of direct or indirect disclosure) or should have known of such Prohibited Conduct.

All University Employees are strongly encouraged to report to the law enforcement any conduct that could potentially present a danger to the community or may be a crime under Connecticut law.

B.CLERY REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

Under the Clery Act, certain University employees are designated as Campus Security Authorities.  CSAs generally include individuals with significant responsibility for campus security or student and campus activities.  Based on information reported to CSAs, the University includes statistics about certain criminal offenses in its annual security report and provides those statistics to the United States Department of Education in a manner that does not include any personally identifying information about individuals involved in an incident. The Clery Act also requires the University to issue timely warnings to the University community about certain reported crimes that may pose a serious or continuing threat to Students and Employees. Consistent with the Clery Act, the University withholds the names and other personally identifying information of Complainants when issuing timely warnings to the University community.

C.      CHILD ABUSE REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

All University Employees except student employees are mandated reporters of child abuse or neglect as defined by Connecticut General Statutes Section 17a-101(b) and must comply with Connecticut’s mandated reporting laws.  See Connecticut General Statutes Sections 17a-101a to 17a-101d. All University Employees should refer to UConn’s Protection of Minors and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect Policy http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=6754) for detailed definitions and reporting information.

VII.   COMPLAINANT OPTIONS FOR REPORTING PROHIBITED CONDUCT 

There are two channels for reporting Prohibited Conduct. A Complainant may choose to report to the University and/or to law enforcement. These two reporting options are not mutually exclusive.  Therefore, Complainants may choose to pursue both the University process and the criminal process concurrently. The University will support Complainants in understanding, assessing and pursuing these options.

The first priority for any individual should be personal safety and well-being.  In addition to seeking immediate medical care, the University encourages all individuals to seek immediate assistance from 911, UConn Police, and/or local law enforcement.  This is the best option to ensure preservation of evidence.  The University also strongly urges that law enforcement be notified immediately in situations that may present imminent or ongoing danger.

A. REPORTING TO LAW ENFORCEMENT

Conduct that violates this Policy may also constitute a crime under the laws of the jurisdiction in which the incident occurred. For example, the State of Connecticut criminalizes and punishes some forms of Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking, and Physical Assault.  See Title 53a of the Connecticut General Statutes for the State of Connecticut’s Penal Code (https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_950.htm).  Whether or not any specific incident of Prohibited Conduct may constitute a crime is a decision made solely by law enforcement.  Similarly, the decision to arrest any individual for engaging in any incident of Prohibited Conduct is determined solely by law enforcement and not the University. Such decisions are based on a number of factors, including availability of admissible evidence.

Complainants have the right to notify or decline to notify law enforcement. In keeping with its commitment to take all appropriate steps to eliminate, prevent, and remedy all Prohibited Conduct, the University urges Complainants (or others who become aware of potential criminal conduct) to report Prohibited Conduct immediately to local law enforcement by contacting:

i. 911 (for emergencies)

ii. University Police (for non-emergencies)

1. Storrs (860) 486-4800

2. Avery Point (860) 405-9088

3. Greater Hartford (860) 570-5173

4. Law School (860) 570-5173

5. Stamford (203) 223-4270

6. Torrington (860) 236-9950

7. Waterbury (203) 236-9950

8. UConn Health (860) 679-2121

iii. State Policy (for conduct occurring off campus in Connecticut) (800) 308-7633

Police have unique legal authority, including the power to seek and execute search warrants, collect forensic evidence, make arrests, and assist in seeking protective and restraining orders. Although a police report may be made at any time, Complainants should be aware that delayed reporting may diminish law enforcement’s ability to take certain actions, including collecting forensic evidence and making arrests. The University will assist Complainants in notifying law enforcement if they choose to do so.  Under limited circumstances posing a threat to health or safety of any University community member, the University may independently notify law enforcement.

B. REPORTING TO THE UNIVERSITY

Complainants (or others who become aware of an incident of Prohibited Conduct) are encouraged to report the incident to the University through the following reporting options:

By contacting the Office of Institutional Equity by telephone, email, or in person during regular office hours (8am-5pm, M-F):

Office of Institutional Equity (Storrs and Regionals)
Wood Hall, First Floor
241 Glenbrook Road
Storrs, Connecticut
(860) 486-2943
equity@uconn.edu
www.titleix.uconn.edu
www.equity.uconn.edu

Office of Institutional Equity (UConn Health)
16 Munson Road, 4th Floor
Farmington, Connecticut
(860) 679-3563
equity@uconn.edu
http://equity.uconn.edu

There is no time limit for a Complainant to report Prohibited Conduct to the University under this Policy;[6]  however, the University’s ability to respond may diminish over time, as evidence may erode, memories may fade, and Respondents may no longer be affiliated with the University. If the Respondent is no longer a Student or an Employee, the University will provide reasonably appropriate remedial measures, assist the Complainant in identifying external reporting options, and take reasonable steps to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects.

The University will not pursue disciplinary action against Complainants or witnesses for disclosure of illegal personal consumption of drugs or alcohol where such disclosures are made in connection with a good faith report or investigation of Prohibited Conduct.

VIII.       ACCESSING CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

The University offers a wide range of resources for all Students and Employees to provide support and guidance in response to any incident of Prohibited Conduct.  Comprehensive information on accessing University and community resources is contained online at the following sites:

  • Sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence, sexual or gender-based harassment, and stalking: titleix.uconn.edu
  • Discrimination and discriminatory harassment where the Respondent is an Employee or Third Party: equity.uconn.edu
  • Related Student Code violations where the Respondent is a Student: community.uconn.edu

Available resources include: emergency and ongoing assistance; health, mental health, and victim-advocacy services; options for reporting Prohibited Conduct to the University and/or law enforcement; and available support with academics, housing, and employment.

A. REMEDIAL AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES

The University offers a wide range of resources for Students and Employees, whether as Complainants or Respondents, to provide support and guidance throughout the initiation, investigation, and resolution of a report of Prohibited Conduct. The University will offer reasonable and appropriate measures to protect a Complainant and facilitate the Complainant’s continued access to University employment or education programs and activities. These measures may be both remedial (designed to address a Complainant’s safety and well-being and continued access to educational opportunities) or protective (designed to reduce the risk of harm to an individual or community). Remedial and protective measures, which may be temporary or permanent, may include no-contact directives, residence modifications, academic modifications and support, work schedule modifications, suspension from employment, and pre-disciplinary leave (with or without pay). Remedial measures are available regardless of whether a Complainant pursues a complaint or investigation under this Policy.

The University will maintain the privacy of any remedial and protective measures provided under this Policy to the extent practicable and will promptly address any violation of the protective measures. The University has the discretion to impose and/or modify any interim measure based on all available information, and is available to meet with a Complainant or Respondent to address any concerns about the provision of interim measures.

The University will provide reasonable remedial and protective measures to Third Parties as appropriate and available, taking into account the role of the Third Party and the nature of any contractual relationship with the University.

B. INTERIM ACTIONS

In addition to remedial and protective measures, an interim action may be imposed on a Student or student organization in accordance with The Student Code prior to the resolution of an investigation. Such action may be taken when, in the professional judgment of a University official, a threat of imminent harm to persons or property exists. Interim administrative action is not a sanction. It is taken in an effort to protect the safety and well-being of the Complainant and/or Respondent, of others, of the University, or of property. Interim administrative action is preliminary in nature; it is in effect only until there is a resolution of the student conduct matter.

University officials designated to impose an interim action through The Student Code include, but are not limited to, staff in Community Standards, Residential Life, and the Office of Institutional Equity.

IX.   PROHIBITED CONDUCT UNDER THIS POLICY[7]

Conduct under this Policy is prohibited regardless of the sex, sexual orientation and/or gender identity/expression of the Complainant or Respondent. Prohibited Conduct includes the following specifically defined forms of behavior: Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual or Gender-Based Harassment, Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Complicity, and Retaliation.

A. DISCRIMINATION 

Discrimination is any unlawful distinction, preference, or detriment to an individual that is based upon an individual’s race, color, ethnicity, religious creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, genetic information, physical or mental disabilities (including learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, past/present history of a mental disorder), veteran status, prior conviction of a crime, workplace hazards to reproductive systems, gender identity or expression, or membership in other protected classes set forth in state or federal law and that: (1) excludes an individual from participation; (2) denies the individual the benefits of; (3) treats the individual differently; or (4) otherwise adversely affects a term or condition of an individual’s employment, education, living environment or participation in a University program or activity.

Discrimination includes failing to provide reasonable accommodation, consistent with state and federal law, to persons with disabilities.  The University of Connecticut is committed to achieving equal educational and employment opportunity and full participation for persons with disabilities.  See Policy Statement: People with Disabilities (http://policy.uconn.edu/2011/05/24/people-with-disabilities-policy-statement/).

B. DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT

Discriminatory Harassment consists of verbal, physical, electronic or other conduct based upon an individual’s race, color, ethnicity, religious creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, genetic information, physical or mental disabilities (including learning disabilities, intellectual disability, past/present history of a mental disorder), veteran status, prior conviction of a crime, workplace hazards to reproductive systems, gender identity or expression, or membership in other protected classes set forth in state or federal law that interferes with that individual’s educational or employment opportunities, participation in a University program or activity, or receipt of legitimately-requested services under either Hostile Environment Harassment or Quid Pro Quo Harassment, as defined below.

Hostile Environment Harassment: Discriminatory Harassment that is so severe, persistent or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with, limits, deprives, or alters the conditions of education (e.g., admission, academic standing, grades, assignment); employment (e.g., hiring, advancement, assignment); or participation in a University program or activity (e.g., campus housing), when viewed from both a subjective and objective perspective.

In evaluating whether a hostile environment exists, the University will consider the totality of known circumstances, including, but not limited to:

  • The frequency, nature and severity of the conduct;
  • Whether the conduct was physically threatening;
  • The effect of the conduct on the Complainant’s mental or emotional state;
  • Whether the conduct was directed at more than one person;
  • Whether the  conduct  arose  in  the  context  of  other  discriminatory conduct;
  • Whether the conduct unreasonably interfered with the Complainant’s educational or work performance and/or University programs or activities; and
  • Whether the conduct implicates concerns related to academic freedom or protected speech.

A hostile environment can be created by persistent or pervasive conduct or by a single or isolated incident, if sufficiently severe. The more severe the conduct, the less need there is to show a repetitive series of incidents to prove a hostile environment, particularly if the conduct is physical.  An isolated incident, unless sufficiently serious, does not amount to Hostile Environment Harassment.

Quid Pro Quo Harassment: Discriminatory Harassment where submission to or rejection of unwelcome conduct is used, explicitly or implicitly, as the basis for decisions affecting an individual’s education (e.g., admission, academic standing, grades, assignment); employment (e.g., hiring, advancement, assignment); or participation in a University program or activity (e.g., campus housing).

Discriminatory Harassment may take many forms, including verbal acts, name-calling, graphic or written statements (including the use of cell phones or the Internet), or other conduct that may be humiliating or physically threatening.

C. SEXUAL OR GENDER-BASED HARASSMENT

Sexual Harassment is any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other unwanted conduct of a sexual nature, whether verbal, non-verbal, graphic, physical, or otherwise, when the conditions for Hostile Environment Harassment or Quid Pro Quo Harassment are present, as defined above.

Sexual Harassment also may include inappropriate touching, acts of sexual violence, suggestive comments and public display of pornographic or suggestive calendars, posters, or signs where such images are not connected to any academic purpose.  A single incident of Sexual Assault (as defined below) may be sufficiently severe to constitute a hostile environment.

Gender-Based Harassment includes harassment based on gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression, which may include acts of aggression, intimidation, or hostility, whether verbal or non-verbal, graphic, physical, or otherwise, even if the acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature, when the conditions for Hostile Environment Harassment or Quid Pro Quo Harassment are present, as defined above.

D. SEXUAL ASSAULT

Sexual Assault consists of (1) Sexual Contact and/or (2) Sexual Intercourse that occurs without (3) Consent.

  1. Sexual Contact (or attempts to commit) is any intentional touching of the breasts, buttocks, groin or genitals, whether clothed or unclothed, with any object(s) or body part, or, any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner, even where the touching does not involve contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth or other orifice.
  1. Sexual Intercourse (or attempts to commit) is any penetration, however slight, of a bodily orifice with any object(s) or body part. Sexual Intercourse includes vaginal or anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger, or any contact between the mouth of one person and the genitalia of another person.
  1. Consent is an understandable exchange of affirmative words or actions, which indicate a willingness to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Consent must be informed, freely and actively given. It is the responsibility of the initiator to obtain clear and affirmative responses at each stage of sexual involvement. Consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. The lack of a negative response is not consent. An individual who is incapacitated by alcohol and/or other drugs both voluntarily or involuntarily consumed may not give consent. Past consent of sexual activity does not imply ongoing future consent.

Consent cannot be given if any of the following are present: Force, Coercion or Incapacitation.

Force is the use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats) and/or coercion that overcome resistance.

Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. Coercion is more than an effort to persuade, entice, or attract another person to have sex.  Conduct does not constitute coercion unless it wrongfully impairs an individual’s freedom of will to choose whether to participate in the sexual activity.

Incapacitation is a state where an individual cannot make rational, reasonable decisions because of mental or physical helplessness, sleep, unconsciousness, or lack of awareness that sexual activity is taking place.  A person may be incapacitated due to the consumption of alcohol or other drugs, or due to a temporary or permanent physical or mental health condition.  A person who is incapacitated lacks the capacity to give Consent because they cannot understand the “who, what, when, where, why, or how” of their sexual interaction.

The University offers the following guidance on Consent and assessing Incapacitation:

A person who wants to engage in a specific sexual activity is responsible for obtaining Consent for that activity. The lack of a negative response or protest does not constitute Consent. Lack of resistance does not constitute Consent. Silence and/or passivity also do not constitute Consent. Relying solely on non-verbal communication before or during sexual activity can lead to misunderstanding and may result in a violation of this Policy.  It is important not to make assumptions about whether a potential partner is consenting. In order to avoid confusion or ambiguity, participants are encouraged to talk with one another before engaging in sexual activity. If confusion or ambiguity arises during sexual activity, participants are encouraged to stop and clarify a mutual willingness to continue that activity.

Consent to one form of sexual activity does not, by itself, constitute Consent to another form of sexual activity. For example, one should not presume that Consent to oral-genital contact constitutes Consent to vaginal or anal penetration. Consent to sexual activity on a prior occasion does not, by itself, constitute Consent to future sexual activity. In cases of prior relationships, the manner and nature of prior communications between the parties and the context of the relationship may have a bearing on the presence of Consent.

Once Consent has been given, it may be withdrawn at any time. An individual who seeks to withdraw Consent must communicate, through clear words or actions, a decision to cease the sexual activity. Once Consent is withdrawn, the sexual activity must cease immediately.

In evaluating Consent in cases of alleged incapacitation, the University asks two questions: (1) Did the person initiating sexual activity know that the other party was incapacitated? and if not, (2) Should a sober, reasonable person in the same situation have known that the other party was incapacitated? If the answer to either of these questions is “YES,” Consent was absent and the conduct is likely a violation of this Policy.

Incapacitation is a state beyond drunkenness or intoxication. A person is not necessarily incapacitated merely as a result of drinking or using drugs.  A person could be incapacitated due to other reasons which may include: sleep, prescribed or over the counter medication, mental or physical disability.  Alcohol-related incapacity results from a level of alcohol ingestion that is more severe than impairment, being under the influence, drunkenness or intoxication.   The impact of alcohol and other drugs varies from person to person.

One is not expected to be a medical expert in assessing incapacitation. One must look for the common and obvious warning signs that show that a person may be incapacitated or approaching incapacitation. Although every individual may manifest signs of incapacitation differently, evidence of incapacity may be detected from context clues, such as:

  • Slurred or incomprehensible speech;
  • Bloodshot eyes;
  • The smell of alcohol on their breath;
  • Shaky equilibrium or unsteady gait;
  • Vomiting;
  • Incontinence;
  • Combativeness or emotional volatility;
  • Unusual behavior; and/or
  • Unconsciousness

Context clues are important in helping to determine incapacitation. These signs alone do not necessarily indicate incapacitation.  A person who is incapacitated may not be able to understand some or all of the following questions: “Do you know where you are?” “Do you know how you got here?” “Do you know what is happening?” “Do you know who is here with you?

One should be cautious before engaging in Sexual Contact or Sexual Intercourse when either party has been drinking alcohol or using other drugs. The introduction of alcohol or other drugs may create ambiguity for either party as to whether Consent has been sought or given. If one has doubt about either party’s level of intoxication, the safe thing to do is to forego all sexual activity.

Being impaired by alcohol or other drugs is no defense to any violation of this Policy.

E. SEXUAL EXPLOITATION

Sexual Exploitation is purposely or knowingly doing or attempting to do any of the following:

  • Recording or photographing private sexual activity and/or a person’s intimate parts (including genitalia, groin, breasts or buttocks) without consent;
  • Disseminating or  posting  images  of  private  sexual  activity and/or  a  person’s intimate parts (including genitalia, groin, breasts or buttocks) without consent;
  • Allowing third parties to observe private sexual activity from a hidden location (g., closet) or through electronic means (e.g., Skype or livestreaming of images);
  • Prostituting another person; or
  • Exposing another person to a sexually transmitted infection or virus without the other’s knowledge.

F. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

Intimate Partner Violence includes any act of violence or threatened act of violence that occurs between individuals who are involved or have been involved in a sexual, dating, spousal, domestic, or other intimate relationship.[8] Intimate Partner Violence may include any form of Prohibited Conduct under this Policy, including Sexual Assault, Stalking, and Physical Assault (as defined herein). Intimate Partner Violence may involve a pattern of behavior used to establish power and control over another person through fear and intimidation, or may involve one-time conduct.  A pattern of behavior is typically determined based on the repeated use of words and/or actions and inactions in order to demean, intimidate, and/or control another person. This behavior can be verbal, emotional and/or physical. Examples of Intimate Partner Violence include, but are not limited to:

  • Slapping;
  • Pulling hair;
  • Punching;
  • Damaging one’s property;
  • Driving recklessly to scare someone;
  • Name calling;
  • Humiliating one in public;
  • Harassment directed toward a current or former partner or spouse; and/or
  • Threats of abuse such as threatening to hit, harm, or use a weapon on another (whether Complainant or acquaintance, friend, or family member of the Complainant), or other forms of verbal threats.

Harming Behavior that includes, but is not limited to, the true threat of or actual physical assault or abuse and also includes harassment, is prohibited pursuant to The Student Code. Harming Behavior will be addressed under this Policy if it involves Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual or Gender-Based Harassment, Intimate Partner Violence, or is part of a course of conduct under the Stalking definition.

G. STALKING

Stalking occurs when a person engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person under circumstances that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others, or to experience substantial emotional distress.

“Course of conduct” means two or more acts, including but not limited to acts in which a person directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about another person, or interferes with another person’s property.

“Substantial emotional distress” means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

“Reasonable person” means a person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the Complainant.

Stalking includes “cyber-stalking,” a particular form of stalking in which a person uses electronic media, such as the internet, social networks, blogs, phones, texts, or other similar devices or forms of contact.

Stalking may include, but is not limited to:

  • Non-consensual communications (face to face, telephone, e-mail);
  • Threatening or obscene gestures;
  • Surveillance/following/pursuit;
  • Showing up outside the targeted individual’s classroom or workplace;
  • Sending gifts (romantic, bizarre, sinister, or perverted); and/or
  • Making threats.

H. RETALIATION

Retaliation means any adverse action taken against a person for making a good faith report of Prohibited Conduct or participating in any proceeding under this Policy. Retaliation includes threatening, intimidating, harassing, coercing or any other conduct that would discourage a reasonable person from engaging in activity protected under this Policy. Retaliation may be present even where there is a finding of “no responsibility” on the allegations of Prohibited Conduct. Retaliation does not include good faith actions lawfully pursued in response to a report of Prohibited Conduct.

Retaliation can include, but is not limited to, actions taken by the University, actions taken by one Student against another Student, actions taken by an Employee against another Employee or Student, or actions taken by a Third Party against a Student or Employee.  See the University’s Non-Retaliation Policy [http://policy.uconn.edu/2011/05/24/non-retaliation-policy/].

I. COMPLICITY 

Complicity is any act taken with the purpose of aiding, facilitating, promoting or encouraging the commission of an act of Prohibited Conduct by another person.

X.   INAPPROPRIATE AMOROUS RELATIONSHIPS

For the purposes of this Policy, “amorous relationships” are defined as intimate, sexual, and/or any other type of amorous encounter or relationship, whether casual or serious, short-term or long-term.

A. INSTRUCTIONAL/STUDENT CONTEXT

All faculty and staff must be aware that amorous relationships with students are likely to lead to difficulties and have the potential to place faculty and staff at great personal and professional risk.  The power difference inherent in the faculty-student or staff-student relationship means that any amorous relationship between a faculty or staff member and a student is potentially exploitative or could at any time be perceived as exploitative and should be avoided.  Faculty and staff engaged in such relationships should be sensitive to the continuous possibility that they may unexpectedly be placed in a position of responsibility for the student’s instruction or evaluation.  In the event of a charge of Sexual Harassment arising from such circumstances, the University will in general be unsympathetic to a defense based upon consent when the facts establish that a faculty-student or staff-student power differential existed within the relationship.

  1. Undergraduate Students

Subject to the limited exceptions herein, all members of the faculty and staff are prohibited from pursuing or engaging in an amorous relationship with any undergraduate student.

  1. Graduate Students

With respect to graduate students (including but not limited to Master’s, Law, Doctoral, and any other post-baccalaureate students), all faculty and staff are prohibited from pursuing or engaging in an amorous relationship with a graduate student under that individual’s authority. Situations of authority include, but are not limited to: teaching; formal mentoring or advising; supervision of research and employment of a student as a research or teaching assistant; exercising substantial responsibility for grades, honors, or degrees; and involvement in disciplinary action related to the student.

Students and faculty/staff alike should be aware that pursuing or engaging in an amorous relationship with any graduate student will limit the faculty or staff member’s ability to teach, mentor, advise, direct work, employ and promote the career of the student involved with him or her in an amorous relationship.

  1. Graduate Students in Positions of Authority

Like faculty and staff members, graduate students may themselves be in a position of authority over other students, for example, when serving as a teaching assistant in a course or when serving as a research assistant and supervising other students in research.  The power difference inherent in such relationships means that any amorous relationship between a graduate student and another student over whom they have authority is potentially exploitative and should be avoided.  All graduate students currently or previously engaged in an amorous relationship with another student are prohibited from serving in a position of authority over that student.  Graduate students also should be sensitive to the continuous possibility that they may unexpectedly be placed in a position of responsibility for another student’s instruction or evaluation.

  1. Pre-existing Relationships with Any Student

The University recognizes that an amorous relationship may exist prior to the time a student enrolls at the University or, for amorous relationships with graduate students, prior to the time the faculty or staff member is placed in a position of authority over the graduate student.  The current or prior existence of such an amorous relationship must be disclosed to the Office of Institutional Equity and/or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations by the employee in a position of authority immediately if the student is an undergraduate, and prior to accepting a supervisory role of any type over any graduate student.

All faculty and staff currently or previously engaged in an amorous relationship with a student are prohibited from the following unless effective steps have been taken in conjunction with Labor Relations and the applicable dean or vice president to eliminate any potential conflict of interest in accordance with this Policy: teaching; formal mentoring or advising; supervising research; exercising responsibility for grades, honors, or degrees; considering disciplinary action involving the student; or employing the student in any capacity – including but not limited to student employment and internships, work study, or as a research or teaching assistant.

Similarly, all graduate students currently or previously engaged in an amorous relationship with another student are prohibited from serving in a position of authority over that student.

  1. If an Amorous Relationship Occurs with Any Student

If, despite these warnings, a faculty member, staff member, or graduate student becomes involved in an amorous relationship with a student in violation of this Policy, the faculty member, staff member, or graduate student must disclose the relationship immediately to the Office of Institutional Equity or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations.  Absent an extraordinary circumstance, no relationships in violation of this Policy will be permitted while the student is enrolled or the faculty or staff member is employed by the University.  In most cases, it will be unlikely that an acceptable resolution to the conflict of interest will be possible, and the faculty or staff member’s employment standing or the graduate student’s position of authority may need to be adjusted until s/he no longer has supervisory or other authority over the student.

In addition to the amorous relationship itself, a faculty, staff or graduate student’s failure to report the existence of an inappropriate amorous relationship with a student is also a violation of this Policy.  The University encourages immediate self-reporting, and will consider this factor in the context of any resolution that may be able to be reached.

B. EMPLOYMENT CONTEXT 

Amorous relationships between supervisors and their subordinate employees often adversely affect decisions, distort judgment, and undermine workplace morale for all employees, including those not directly engaged in the relationship.  Any University employee who participates in supervisory or administrative decisions concerning an employee with whom s/he has or has had an amorous relationship has a conflict of interest in those situations. These types of relationships, specifically those involving spouses and/or individuals who reside together, also may violate the State Code of Ethics for Public Officials as well as the University’s Policy on Employment and Contracting for Service of Relatives.

Accordingly, the University prohibits all faculty and staff from pursuing or engaging in amorous relationships with employees whom they supervise.  No supervisor shall initiate or participate in institutional decisions involving a direct benefit or penalty (employment, retention, promotion, tenure, salary, leave of absence, etc.) to a person with whom that individual has or has had an amorous relationship.  The individual in a position of authority can be held accountable for creating a sexually hostile environment or failing to address a sexually hostile environment and thus should avoid creating or failing to address a situation that adversely impacts the working environment of others.

  1. Pre-existing Amorous Relationships Between Supervisors and Subordinate Employees

The University recognizes that an amorous relationship may exist prior to the time an individual is assigned to a supervisor.  Supervisory, decision-making, oversight, evaluative or advisory relationships for someone with whom there exists or previously has existed an amorous relationship is unacceptable unless effective steps have been taken to eliminate any potential conflict of interest in accordance with this Policy.  The current or prior existence of such a relationship must be disclosed by the employee in a position of authority prior to accepting supervision of the subordinate employee to the Office of Institutional Equity and/or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations.  Working with the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations, the relevant managers will determine whether the conflict of interest can be eliminated through termination of the situation of authority.  The final determination will be at the sole discretion of the relevant dean or vice president.

  1. If an Amorous Relationship Occurs or has Occurred between a Supervisor and his/her Subordinate Employee

If, despite these warnings, a University employee enters into an amorous relationship with someone over whom s/he has supervisory, decision-making, oversight, evaluative, or advisory responsibilities, that employee must disclose the existence of the relationship immediately to the Office of Institutional Equity and/or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations.  In consultation with appropriate University administrators, the relevant dean or vice president will determine whether the conflict of interest can be eliminated.  The final determination will be at the sole discretion of the relevant dean or vice president.  In most cases, it will be unlikely that an acceptable resolution to the conflict of interest will be possible.  If the conflict of interest cannot be eliminated, the supervisor’s employment standing may need to be adjusted.  In addition to the amorous relationship itself, a supervisor’s failure to report the existence of the relationship with a subordinate employee is also a violation of this Policy.  The University encourages immediate self-reporting, and will consider this factor in the context of any resolution that may be able to be reached.

XI. PREVENTION, AWARENESS AND TRAINING PROGRAMS

The University is committed to the prevention of Prohibited Conduct through regular and ongoing education and awareness programs. Incoming Students and new Employees receive primary prevention and awareness programming as part of their orientation, and returning Students and current Employees receive ongoing training and related education and awareness programs. The University provides training, education and awareness programs to Students and Employees to ensure broad understanding of this Policy and the topics and issues related to maintaining an education and employment environment free from harassment and discrimination.

For a description of the University’s Prohibited Conduct prevention and awareness programs, including programs on minimizing the risk of incidents of Prohibited Conduct and bystander intervention, see the University’s annual Clery reports (found online at:  http://publicsafety.uconn.edu/police/clery/about-clery/uconn-and-the-clery-act/ ).

XII. OBLIGATION TO PROVIDE TRUTHFUL INFORMATION

All University community members are expected to provide truthful information in any report, investigation, or proceeding under this Policy. Submitting or providing false or misleading information in bad faith or with a view to personal gain or intentional harm to another in connection with an incident of Prohibited Conduct is prohibited and subject to disciplinary sanctions under The Student Code (for Students), The Code of Conduct (for Employees), and any other applicable and appropriate University policy or policies. This provision does not apply to reports made or information provided in good faith, even if the facts alleged in the report are not later substantiated.

XIII.  RELATED POLICIES

A. STUDENTS

Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code: http://community.uconn.edu/the-student-code-preamble/

B. EMPLOYEES AND THIRD PARTIES

Policy Statement: People With Disabilities: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=419
Protection of Minors and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect Policy: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=6754
Non-Retaliation Policy: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=415
Policy Statement: Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=102
Age Act Policy: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=2007
Code of Conduct (employees): http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=140
Code of Conduct for University of Connecticut Vendors:  http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=2718
Policy on Employment and Contracting for Service of Relatives: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=357

XIV. POLICY REVIEW

This Policy is maintained by the Office of Institutional Equity. The University will periodically review and update this Policy and will evaluate, among other things, any changes in legal requirements, existing University resources, and the resolution of cases from the preceding year (including, but not limited to, timeframes for completion and sanctions and remedies imposed).
[1] UConn recognizes that an individual may choose to self-identify as a victim or a survivor.  For consistency in this Policy, the University uses the term Complainant to maintain the neutrality of the Policy and procedures.

[2] Definitions for all forms of Prohibited Conduct can be found in Section IX of this Policy.

[3] Although this Policy is directed primarily to disclosures by Students, as explained herein certain supervisory employees are obligated to report disclosures about all types of Prohibited Conduct involving a University employee.

[4] While Employees are encouraged to report any form of Prohibited Conduct, only Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence and Stalking must be reported under this Policy.

[5] These supervisory employees are required to report all forms of Prohibited Conduct where the Complainant or Respondent is an Employee.

[6]  This statement does not relieve Responsible Employees of their obligation to report Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence and/or Stalking involving a Student immediately to the Office of Institutional Equity.

[7] These definitions may overlap with Connecticut criminal statutes in some cases, and provide greater protection in other instances.  Connecticut’s Penal Code may be found in Title 53a of the Connecticut General Statutes.  (https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_950.htm)

[8] Intimate Partner Violence includes “dating violence” and “domestic violence,” as defined by VAWA. Consistent with VAWA, the University will evaluate the existence of an intimate relationship based upon the Complainant’s statement and taking into consideration the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Information Regarding Admission/Readmission for Students with Behavioral History

Title: Information Regarding Admission/Readmission for Students with Behavioral History
Process Owner:  Behavioral History Review Committee
Applies to: Undergraduate and Graduate Student Populations
Campus Applicability: Excludes UConn Health and the School of Law
Effective Date: June 26, 2015
For More Information, Contact Dean of Students
Contact Information: dos@uconn.edu

 

The University of Connecticut is committed to providing a safe environment for its students, faculty, and staff. To promote this environment, all applicants for admission to the University are required to indicate whether they have been subject to disciplinary action for earlier behavioral misconduct or have been convicted of any crime. To ensure that applicants indicating such conduct receive a fair evaluation, the appropriate admission authority (i.e., The Graduate School, Undergraduate Admissions, Dean of Students) will refer such applicants on to the Behavioral History Review Committee (BHRC), which will undertake a thorough and holistic review of the conduct they identify in the context of their application for admission.  If the candidate for admission is otherwise identified as a viable candidate for admission by the respective admissions office, the BHRC Review of this history may result in denying an applicant admission to the university, admitting an applicant subject to certain conditions (e.g., restricting access to on-campus housing or requiring participation in counseling services), or admitting an applicant without any restrictions.

The BHRC is chaired by the Dean of Students office and is charged with the responsibility of reviewing and mutually determining admissibility of applicants, in conjunction with the appropriate admissions authorities, who identify having a criminal and/or behavioral history

Membership within the Behavioral History Review Committee (BHRC) consists of:

Dean of Students, and/or designee (Chair)

Dean of the Graduate School, and/or designee

Director of Undergraduate Admissions, and/or designee

Director of Community Standards, and/or designee

General Counsel, and/or designee (advisory capacity only, attends on as needed basis)

Chief of Police, and/or designee

BHRC Procedure

Applicants for admission or readmission will be required to identify through the application any prior criminal conviction or disciplinary history.   Applicants will be instructed that if they identify any prior criminal conviction or disciplinary history, it will be their responsibility to supply with their application:

For criminal convictions:

  • A statement explaining the circumstances of each conviction;
  • Documentation (police and/or court records) for all such convictions. UConn will not contact a courthouse or attorney on behalf of an applicant.

For prior disciplinary history

  • A statement explaining the circumstances of each instance of discipline
  • Any documents the applicant believes relevant or helpful
  • Certification of disciplinary history from previous institution(s)

Applicants will be advised that their application is incomplete until all information related to a criminal conviction or disciplinary history is received by the University, that it is their responsibility to obtain and provide records and documents, and that failure to provide truthful responses on the application and/or supporting material may result in revocation of admission and/or disciplinary action by the University.

Upon receipt of proper documentation, the appropriate admissions authority will contact the Chair of the BHRC for preliminary review.  Preliminary review may result in mutual agreement that applicant is able to enter the university community without restriction and therefore may move forward through the appropriate admissions process.

All other candidates, including those that cannot be mutually agreed upon and/or may result in denial or admission with restrictions shall be referred on to the BHRC for full committee review.

Committee Review Process

The purpose of the BHRC is to review the relevant information to make a determination whether an applicant with conviction or disciplinary history is eligible for admission and the conditions associated with admission, if any.  Such a determination shall be made only after considering the nature of the misconduct or crime and its relationship to the program for which the person has applied; information pertaining to the degree of rehabilitation of the applicant; the time elapsed since the misconduct, conviction, or release from incarceration; and  the essay and other information provided by the applicant.  The BHRC will include as necessary and on an ad hoc basis a representative from the school or program to which the applicant seeks admission so that the BHRC has the benefit of that input and any program specific considerations.[1]   The BHRC will also have the ability to request additional information from and/or an interview with the applicant.

The findings of the committee will be communicated to the applicant by the appropriate office:

  • Entering Undergraduates: Admissions
  • Entering BGS: ACES
  • Returning Undergraduates seeing Re-admission: Dean of Students Office
  • Graduate Students: Dean of The Graduate School
  • Entering Non Degree: Registrar

The findings of the BHRC are final and not subject to appeal.

Failure to Disclose

If a student fails to disclose a prior criminal conviction or disciplinary action on her/his application for admission,  the University may rescind admission based solely on that failure to disclose.

[1] For example, under state law there are specific crimes which would make an applicant ineligible to be certified to teach.

University Logo and Wordmark Policy

Title: University Logo and Wordmark Policy
Policy Owner: University Communications
Applies to: All Employees, Students, Others
Campus Applicability: All Campuses, including UConn Health
Effective Date: 2/1/2015
For More Information, Contact Patti Fazio, Assistant VP for Brand Strategy
Contact Information: 860-486-5634
Official Website: http://brand.uconn.edu/

1/15/15

The UConn wordmark is the core element in the visual identity system. It is the official logo of the University, and is what is most strongly associated with the UConn brand. In order to be effective, all logo treatments must be consistent and accurate, and as such, coordinated through University Communications.

Custom marks are available for schools, colleges, departments, and University-affiliated groups to distinctly identify themselves, while maintaining a cohesive University brand identity. All primary and established wordmarks can be downloaded from brand.uconn.edu. Additional standards regarding wordmarks and logos can also be found at brand.uconn.edu. Standards related to UConn Health branding can be found at brand.uchc.edu.

Official UConn Wordmark

  • An official UConn wordmark must be used as the primary identifier for University entities. These include the primary, established, and personalized wordmarks. These wordmarks cannot be altered or replicated.
    • The primary wordmark is the logo that includes UCONN with or without “University of Connecticut.” The horizontal or vertical arrangements are acceptable.
    • Established wordmarks have been created for each school, college, and regional campus.
    • For UConn entities that do not have an established wordmark, a personalized wordmark is appropriate. This mark allows for one or two levels of information hierarchy. University Communications can provide   guidance on layouts that best suits individual needs.
  • Student organizations should refer to Student Organization Use of University Wordmarks and Logos for standards specific to their needs.

Secondary Logos

Secondary logos are marks that are separate from the official UConn wordmark established and enforced by the University brand standards.

Secondary logos are only considered for consortiums, retail establishments, departmental initiatives, or Centers that are not exclusively part of the University, such as the Korey Stringer Institute.

For UConn entities that do not fit fully into these specific categories, the UConn wordmark must be used as the primary identifying mark. Complementary artwork is permissible. Complementary artwork cannot include the name of the UConn entity, to avoid appearing like a logo.

Anniversaries, events, or campaigns can use badges to mark the event, but must not use the UConn wordmark as part of the graphic.

The development of all secondary logos is at the review and approval of University Communications. For full brand standards, visit brand.uconn.edu.

Trademarks

UConn’s Office of Trademark Licensing and Branding ensures correct and legal use of UConn trademarks on any product sold to the general public or to campus departments and organizations. UConn trademarks include the UConn wordmark, the University oakleaf, the University seal, the Husky Dog and phrases such as Students Today, Huskies Forever. Trademark and licensing approval is required for includes usage in the areas of Traditional Retail Merchandise, use by Campus Departments and Student Organizations, use by Affiliated Organizations (e.g., UConn Co-op, UConn Foundation, UConn Alumni Association) and use by Non-UConn organizations (e.g., alumni clubs, booster clubs, approved corporate use). The Office of Trademark Licensing and Branding provides approval for all trademark usage and may be contacted at licensing@uconn.edu

Paid Sick Leave for Certain Temporary Employees

Title: Paid Sick Leave for Certain Temporary Employees
Policy Owner: Payroll Department
Applies to: Temporary Classified Employees
Campus Applicability:  Storrs and Regional Campuses
Effective Date: August 19, 2014
For More Information, Contact Payroll Department
Contact Information: (860) 486-2423
Official Website: http://www.payroll.uconn.edu/

 

REASON FOR POLICY

The purpose of this policy is to comply with CT Public Act 11-52 (CGS 31-57r through 31-57w), and administer paid sick leave to certain classified employees who meet the definition of ‘service worker’, but do not receive paid sick leave under a collective bargaining agreement.

APPLIES TO

This policy applies to certain temporary classified employees at the University of Connecticut, Storrs and Regional Campuses who meet the definition of ‘service worker’ but do not receive paid sick leave under a collective bargaining agreement.

DEFINITION

A ‘temporary position’, as defined by the State Personnel Act, is a position in state service (classified) which is expected to require the services of an incumbent for a period not in excess of 6 months.  A ‘service worker’ is defined under CT Public Act 11-52 (CGS 31-57r through 31-57w): http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/wgwkstnd/SickLeaveLaw.htm

POLICY STATEMENT

Accrual of Paid Sick Leave:

Certain temporary classified employees of the University of Connecticut begin to accrue paid sick time beginning January 1, 2012 or upon hire, whichever is later, under the following terms and conditions:

  1. Eligible employees accrue one hour of paid time for every forty (40) hours actually worked.
  2. The maximum accrual of sick time hours is forty (40) hours per calendar year.
  3. Eligible employees may carry over a maximum of 40 hours of unused sick time from one calendar year into the next but the employee shall not be able to use more than the forty (40) hours in one (1) calendar year.
  4. Under no circumstances are eligible employees entitled to any payout for accumulated but unused sick leave.

Use of Paid Sick Leave:

Eligible employees shall be entitled to the use of accrued paid sick leave upon the completion of their 680th hour of employment with the University measured from January 1, 2012 or from their date of hire if hired after January 1, 2012.

Sick leave must be taken in one (1) hour increments

A maximum of forty (40) hours of sick leave may be used each calendar year.

Sick leave may only be used in lieu of previously scheduled hours.

Pay Rate for Sick Leave:

Sick leave will be paid at the employee’s normal hourly rate at the time the leave is taken.

Reasons for Use of Paid Sick Leave:

Eligible Employees may only use accrued paid sick leave for the following reasons:

  1. To treat the employee’s own illness, injury or health condition; for the medical diagnosis, care or treatment of the employee’s own mental illness or physical illness, injury or health condition; or for preventative medical care for the employee.
  2. For the treatment of the employee’s child’s or spouse’s illness, injury or health condition; the medical diagnosis, care or treatment of an employee’s child’s or spouse’s mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; or preventative medical care for the employee’s child or spouse.
  3. For the employee’s treatment or services related to the employee’s status as a victim in a family violence or sexual assault incident, for the medical care or psychological or other counseling for physical or psychological injury or disability; to obtain services from a victim services organization; to relocate due to such family violence or sexual assault; to participate in any civil or criminal proceedings related to or resulting from such family violence or sexual assault.

Notice:

If the reason for the sick leave is foreseeable, the employee must provide at least seven (7) days advance notice to their supervisor,or if the leave is not foreseeable, the employee must provide as much notice as is practicable.

Documentation:

Documentation signed by a health care provider indicating the need for the number of days taken may be required by the employee’s supervisor for leaves of three (3) or more consecutive days.

 

ENFORCEMENT

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University Laws and By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for All University Employees, applicable collective bargaining agreements, and the University of Connecticut Student Conduct Code.

PROCEDURES/FORMS

Resources to assist hiring departments in administering this policy can be found on the Payroll Department website at http://www.payroll.uconn.edu

Workers’ Compensation Light Duty Policy

Title: Workers’ Compensation Light Duty Policy
Policy Owner: Payroll Department
Applies to: All University Employees
Campus Applicability: Storrs and Regional Campuses (see details below)
Effective Date: August 19, 2014
For More Information, Contact Payroll
Contact Information: (860) 486-2423
Official Website: http://www.payroll.uconn.edu/

REASON FOR POLICY

The University strives to provide a safe and healthy work environment and is committed to returning employees to work, as appropriate, from a work-related injury or illness.  Administering a policy on light duty provides benefits to both the injured worker and the University.  Statistically, employers that facilitate return to work programs have a higher percentage of injured workers achieving full recovery over employers who fail to provide such programs.  Additionally, employers that utilize such initiatives have lower direct costs associated with workers’ compensation than those who do not.

APPLIES TO

This policy applies to all permanent and temporary employees at the University of Connecticut, Storrs and Regional Campuses who are paid salary or wages by the State of Connecticut are covered by the State’s Workers’ Compensation Program, and are eligible to participate in the light duty program.  This includes faculty, staff, student labor, work study, special payroll, and graduate assistants provided that the injury occurred while performing a function related to their employment with the University.

DEFINITIONS

Injured Worker:  An employee who initiates a workers’ compensation claim pursuant to the State of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut’s injury reporting requirements.
Temporary Modified/Restricted Duty:  A work capacity given to an injured worker by their treating physician stating that the employee is not capable of performing their regular job duties, but is capable of working in a modified or restricted capacity within their normal job classification.
Regular Duty:  A work capacity given to an injured worker by their treating physician stating that the injured worker is capable of returning to work without restrictions or modifications to their normal job classification.

POLICY STATEMENT

The University of Connecticut provides a light duty program for all employees who sustain a workplace injury or illness.  The University will provide modified or light duty assignments, as available, to an employee with an approved workers’ compensation claim, once they have been released to temporary modified/restricted work by a licensed medical professional.  Placement into a light duty position is on a temporary basis and should never become permanent.  Light duty is not guaranteed and may be modified, or ended, at any time, even if the employee’s physician has not released him/her to regular duty.  Employees who are working a light duty assignment will be held to the same standards of accountability for performance and conduct standards as an employee on regular duty.  An employee working on a light duty assignment is to abide by the restrictions imposed by their treating physician and should not exceed those restrictions until released by the doctor.  It is also the employee’s responsibility to immediately inform their supervisor and the Workers’ Compensation Administrator of any changes made to their work capacity while working a light duty assignment.

If a light duty assignment is offered by the University, an employee’s refusal to accept the offer of light duty may affect the employee’s right to workers’ compensation benefits and will be determined by the third party administrator.

ENFORCEMENT

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University Laws and By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for All University Employees, applicable collective bargaining agreements, and the University of Connecticut Student Conduct Code.

PROCEDURES/FORMS

An injured employee should immediately notify their supervisor and the Workers’ Compensation Administrator once their treating physician has released them to any type of modified or restricted work.  The employee must also provide the Workers’ Compensation Administrator with a signed, written copy of the modifications/restrictions given to them by the treating physician.  The Workers’ Compensation Administrator will coordinate with the employee’s supervisor to determine if a light duty assignment is available.  If such a position exists, the employee will be contacted and expected to return to work on the next scheduled business day.  Under no such circumstance should an employee work outside their prescribed restrictions until cleared to do so by their treating physician.  Supervisors should monitor the tasks being completed by an employee working temporary modified/restricted duty to ensure that the employee is working within their prescribed restrictions.

If a light duty assignment is not available, the employee will be continued on their workers’ compensation leave.  Should a light duty assignment become available prior to a change in the employee’s work capacity, the employee will be notified by either their supervisor or the Workers’ Compensation Administrator, and would be expected to return to work on the next business day.  An employee with a light duty work capacity that cannot be accommodated may be required to do job searches at the discretion of the third party administrator, in order to continue to receive payment.

Service Center Policy

Title: Service Center Policy
Policy Owner: Robin Hoagland
Applies to: Faculty, Staff and Designated Affiliates
Campus Applicability: UConn Storrs and Regionals
Effective Date: December 26, 2014
For More Information, Contact Robin Hoagland
Contact Information: (860) 486-3780
Official Website: http://accountingoffice.uconn.edu/

 

REASON FOR POLICY

To ensure that the University is in compliance with the cost principles and accounting standards set forth by the federal government.

APPLIES TO

This policy applies to faculty, staff and designated affiliates of the University of Connecticut, Storrs and Regional Campuses.

DEFINITIONS

Service Center– a unit which charges a rate to recover the full allowable cost of goods or services provided.  This differs from a unit which charges another area for the cost of the goods or services only, without consideration of other recoverable costs such as overhead costs.  A unit of this type is defined as a “Recharge Center”.

OMB Uniform Guidance – publication of the Office of Management and Budget titled “Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards.”

Governmental Cost Accounting Standards (CAS) – standards and rules administered by the federal government for use in achieving uniformity and consistency under federal contracts.

Service Center and Cost Recovery Committee (SCCRC) – a University committee responsible for approving the establishment of and rates charged by University Service Centers.

POLICY STATEMENT

The Office of Cost Analysis (OCA), a unit within the University’s Accounting Office, is responsible for ensuring that the establishment of and the rates charged  by  University Service Centers are approved by the SCCRC in accordance with OMB Uniform Guidance.  The Office of Cost Analysis reviews the rates charged by Service Centers, and ensures that the rates are consistent with good business practice and comply with all applicable regulatory and legal requirements, including those outlined in OMB Uniform Guidance and the Governmental Cost Accounting Standards (CAS).  The OCA will ensure that federal grants and contracts are not charged a rate that is higher than what any other internal or external customer may be charged for goods and services.  External rates include indirect costs or overhead, whereas internal rates include only direct costs.  Departments operating Service Centers must have the Center and the rates used by the Center, approved by the SCCRC in advance of commencing operations.

Additional information on Service Centers and cost accounting principles at the University can be found in the Cost Accounting Disclosure Statements (CADS):

Direct and Indirect Costs of Federal Grants and Contracts http://www.costacct.uconn.edu/CADS1.doc

Cost Sharing http://www.costacct.uconn.edu/CADS2.doc

Financial Management of Service Centers http://www.costacct.uconn.edu/CADS3.HTM

ENFORCEMENT

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University Laws and By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for All University Employees, applicable collective bargaining agreements, and the University of Connecticut Student Conduct Code.

PROCEDURES/FORMS

For more information on OMB Uniform Guidance, please see

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants_docs