Academic and Student Life

Alcoholic Beverage Sales and Service Policy

Title: Alcoholic Beverage Sales and Service, Policy on
Policy Owner: Department of Dining Services
Applies to: Students, Employees, Others
Campus Applicability: All Campuses
Effective Date: October 23, 2017
For More Information, Contact Department of Dining Services or
UConn Health
Contact Information: (860) 486-3128 (Storrs/Regional Campuses)
(860) 679-4177 (UConn Health)
Official Website: http://www.dining.uconn.edu

Purpose

To provide specific requirements for the sale and/or service of alcoholic beverages at University sponsored events.

Scope

This policy does not apply to non-University on-campus entities (such as the University of Connecticut Foundation and the Nathan Hale Inn) or off campus Athletic venues.

Definitions

University Sponsored Events: An official activity, function or meeting operated and/or financially supported by the University of Connecticut, whether on- or off-campus.

Permanent Installation: A permanent foodservice operated by the Department of Dining Services on a Regional Campus.

POLICY STATEMENT

Alcohol Service on University Campuses: The Department of Dining Services is the sole liquor permit-holder on University campuses with a Permanent Installation, and is solely responsible for ensuring the proper service of alcohol at any on-campus University Sponsored Event where a Permanent Installation exists. Campuses with a Permanent Installation must use the Department of Dining Services to serve alcohol. At campuses without a Permanent Installation (except UConn Health) departments must seek approval from the Department of Dining Services to use an alternate service. Requests must be approved in writing by the Department of Dining Services. At UConn Health, requests must be approved in writing by the Dean of the School of Medicine, the Dean of the School of Dental Medicine, or the Chief Administrative Officer, as appropriate.

Alcohol Service at Off-Campus University Sponsored Events:  If alcohol is to be served at an off-campus University Sponsored Event, the individuals responsible for event planning must ensure that the sale and/or service of alcohol complies with this policy.

Sales and Service of Alcoholic Beverages

Alcoholic beverages may be possessed, served, sold or consumed at a University Sponsored Event or Permanent Installation only under the following conditions:

  • In no circumstances may alcohol be purchased with University funds or Trustee student organization fees, either directly or indirectly. For example, funds used to purchase food or cover facility fees may never subsidize the purchase of alcohol.
  • Service and sale of alcoholic beverages is covered by an appropriate liquor permit. At campuses with a Permanent Installation, this is the Department of Dining Services’ liquor permit. At campuses without a Permanent Installation, including UConn Health, this is an approved vendor or caterer’s liquor permit.
  • Alcohol servers are TIPS (Training for Intervention Procedures) certified.
  • Alcoholic beverages are served as a complement to a planned program or event with a legitimate University business purpose.
  • Alcoholic beverage service is accompanied by food service and non-alcoholic beverage alternatives in amounts sufficient for all attendees.

Additional restrictions include:

  • Alcohol service is prohibited in academic buildings while classes are in session in that building. At UConn Health, exceptions must be approved in writing by the appropriate Dean or the Chief Administrative Officer.
  • University employees may not host department meetings or gatherings on campus and supply their own alcohol.
  • At campuses with a Permanent Installation, all alcohol service must be arranged, purchased, and served by the Department of Dining Services. External caterers may not provide alcohol on these campuses.
  • No alcoholic beverages may be served for any group of students of the University, or for any function, where it is reasonable to expect consumption by persons under the age of twenty-one years.

Campuses without the Presence of the Department of Dining Services

If alcohol is to be served at a University Sponsored Event at a campus without a Permanent Installation (except UConn Health), the individuals responsible for event planning must first submit a request for approval to the Department of Dining Services. This form is located at https://dining.uconn.edu/alcohol-request-form/. At UConn Health, requests must be submitted using this form and approved by the Dean of the School of Medicine, the Dean of the School of Dental Medicine, or the Chief Administrative Officer, as appropriate.

Exceptions to this policy may be granted by the Office of the President. At all times, any entity serving alcohol on campus must have the appropriate liquor permit.

Enforcement

This policy is intended to complement existing University policy regarding alcohol, including but not limited to, the General Rules of Conduct, Student Code, and the University Policy on Alcohol and Other Drugs.

Violations of these policies may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for All University Employees, applicable collective bargaining agreements, and the University of Connecticut Student Code.  Depending on the nature and severity of the violations, additional sanctions may be enacted.

Space Management Policy

Title: Space Management Policy
Policy Owner: University Planning, Design & Construction (UPDC)
Applies to: Faculty, Staff
Campus Applicability: All campuses except UConn Health
Effective Date: June 12, 2017
For More Information, Contact University Planning, Design & Construction (UPDC)
Contact Information: (860) 486-2776
Official Website: http://updc.uconn.edu

REASON FOR POLICY

The availability of facilities and space plays an important role in advancing the mission and goals of the University of Connecticut. It is in the University’s best interest to allocate space in an objective and consistent manner based on the University‘s mission and priorities.

APPLIES TO

This policy applies to the Storrs and all regional campuses and designated affiliates or approved units of the University of Connecticut at those campuses. This policy does not apply to UConn Health.

POLICY STATEMENT

All space belongs to the University and is assigned to units, schools, departments or programs based on University’s priorities and the functional requirements of each user group.  The University may reallocate space at any time as needs and priorities change.

Decisions regarding the allocation of occupied and unoccupied space are based on campus and program priorities, Academic and Strategic Plans, the Master Plan for the campus, and overall need.

The President of the University has ultimate authority over space assignments. The Provost, Vice Presidents, and Division of Athletics Director are responsible for allocating and managing space occupied by activities under their control or within their divisions in accordance with the University’s Space Planning Guidelines.

The Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs has overall responsibility for the equitable and optimal use of academic and research space resources, with final authority over all UConn academic and research space assignments and designations in collaboration with the Office of the Executive Vice President for Administration and Chief Financial Officer.

The Office of the Executive Vice President for Administration and Chief Financial Officer has final jurisdiction over all UConn non-academic and non-research spaces in collaboration with the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs except for those spaces identified below.

All space occupied  by the Division of Student Affairs (e.g. Student Union, Recreation Center) will be the responsibility of the Vice President for Student Affairs in collaboration with the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Office of the Executive Vice President for Administration and Chief Financial Officer.

All space occupied  by the Division of Athletics will be the responsibility of the Director of Athletics in collaboration with the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Office of the Executive Vice President for Administration and Chief Financial Officer.

The University Planning office within University Planning, Design and Construction is responsible for reviewing space requests and making recommendations to the appropriate authority.

The four officers with authority over space will coordinate all significant space decisions with the Office of the President.   The President as the chief executive and administrative officer of the University has the authority and responsibility to make all final decisions regarding space.

PROCEDURES AND GUIDELINES

For roles and responsibilities, Space Planning Procedures: http://updc.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1525/2017/06/Space-Procedures-June-2017.pdf 

For assigning space: Space is assigned in accordance with the Space Planning Guidelines: http://updc.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1525/2016/10/Appendix-III-UConn-Space-Standards-September-2016.pdf

Requesting additional space or making modifications to existing space is governed by Space Planning: http://paes.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1525/2015/10/SpaceChangeForm-revised-021312.pdf

ENFORCEMENT

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for All University Employees, applicable collective bargaining agreements, and the University of Connecticut Student Code.

POLICY HISTORY:

Policy created:  6/12/2017 (Approved by Cabinet)

Animals on Campus

Title: Animals on Campus
Policy Owner: Office of Institutional Equity
Applies to: Students, All Employees, Contractors, Vendors, Visitors, Guests and Other Third Parties
Campus Applicability: All
Effective Date: June 9, 2017
For More Information, Contact Office of Institutional Equity
Contact Information: (860) 486-2943 & (860) 679-3563
Official Website: http://www.equity.uconn.edu and http://accessibility.uconn.edu

Related Policies are:

Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment and Related Interpersonal Violence
Policy Statement: People with Disabilities

Related Documents are:

UCH Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals
Frequently Asked Questions

1. PURPOSE 

This policy provides the rules concerning individuals bringing animals on University property. This policy applies to all University campuses. Specific procedures regarding the presence of animals in UConn Health clinical practice and patient care areas are outlined in the UConn Health Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals.

2. LEGAL 

The Americans with Disabilities Act governs the use of service animals by individuals with disabilities. See 42 U.S.C. § 12101, et seq. The Fair Housing Act governs the use of emotional support animals (ESA’s) by individuals with disabilities in housing. See 42 U.S.C. § 3601, et seq. Connecticut state law regarding service animals may be found under C.G.S. § 46a-44.

3. DEFINITIONS

Controlled Space
For purposes of this policy, controlled spaces are not public spaces. Controlled spaces are defined as any indoor area owned or controlled by the University, and any outdoor area owned or controlled by the University with limitations on use or access (e.g., practice fields, stadiums, farm, tennis courts, etc.). Areas open to the public (i.e., streets, lawns, sidewalks, parking lots) with no limitations on access are not controlled spaces.

Handler
An individual with a disability who is the owner and user, or trainer of a service animal or ESA, or the owner or individual bringing an animal onto University property.

Emotional Support Animal (ESA)
Any animal specifically designated by a qualified medical provider that alleviates one or more identified symptoms of an individual’s disability. Such animal may afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling, workplace, or other area, provided there is a nexus between the individual’s disability and the assistance the animal provides. ESA’s are also commonly known as companion, therapeutic or assistance animals. ESA’s are not service animals.

Pet
For purposes of this policy, a pet is any animal that is not a service animal or ESA.

Public Spaces

For purposes of this policy, public spaces are indoor and outdoor areas that are open to the general public. Classrooms, residence halls and most employee workspaces are not generally considered public spaces.

Service Animal
Any dog specifically trained to perform a task for the benefit of an individual with a disability. In some circumstances, a miniature horse may be considered a service animal. The tasks performed by a service animal must directly relate to the individual’s disability.
Service Animal in Training
For purposes of this policy, a service animal in training is a dog that is being trained as a service animal and includes a puppy that is being raised to become a service animal in training.

University Property
For purposes of this policy, University property includes all areas owned or controlled by the University.

4. APPLICABILITY

This policy applies to all individuals bringing an animal on University property.

5. POLICY

5.1 Prohibition
All individuals are generally prohibited from bringing animals into any buildings or other controlled spaces on University property. However, individuals with disabilities are allowed to bring service animals and ESA’s on and/or into controlled spaces as provided below. In addition, faculty and staff are permitted to have pets in University-owned residential housing only to the extent permitted by the lease governing their rental agreement.  Exceptions for individuals in residence halls may be made in the sole discretion of the Executive Director of Residential Life or designee for exigent circumstances or other good cause shown consistent with the spirit and intent of this policy.
5.2 Service Animals
The University welcomes the presence of service animals assisting people with disabilities on its campuses consistent with the provisions of this policy and applicable law. A service animal is generally permitted to be on University property in any place where the animal’s handler is permitted to be. In certain limited situations, a service animal may be prohibited for safety and health reasons. The accompaniment of an individual with a disability by a service animal in a location with health and safety restrictions will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the appropriate department representative(s) in collaboration with the Department of Human Resources and/or the Center for Students with Disabilities.

Members of the University community, are prohibited from interfering in any way with a service animal, or the duties it performs.

5.3 Service Animals in Training
Connecticut law entitles any individual training a service animal to enter public spaces. A service animal in training is not allowed in controlled spaces including classrooms, residence halls and employee work areas. The individual training a service animal must be authorized to engage in designated training activities by a service animal organization or an individual who volunteers for a service animal organization that authorizes such volunteers to raise dogs to become service animals.  Individuals training a service animal must carry photographic identification indicating authorization to train the animal. A service animal in training, including a puppy that is being raised to become a service animal in training, must be identified with either tags, ear tattoos, identifying bandanas (on puppies), identifying coats (on adult dogs), or leashes and collars.

5.4 Emotional Support Animals (ESA’s)
An approved ESA owned by an individual who lives in University housing is permitted within the individual’s privately assigned living accommodations. An ESA  outside the private individual living accommodations must be in an animal carrier or controlled by a leash or harness.  ESA’s are not allowed in any other controlled spaces without advance permission. ESA’s are permitted to be in outdoor public areas to the same extent as pets.

An ESA owned by an individual employed by the University may be permitted within the individual’s workplace as an accommodation for a disability, but must be approved in advance by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Case Manager at the Department of Human Resources as outlined in Section 6.1 below.

5.5 Pets
Pets generally are not permitted in or on any controlled space on University property, and are permitted only in outdoor areas open to the general public.

5.6 Handler’ Responsibilities
5.6.1 A service animal, service animal in training, ESA or pet must be supervised directly by the handler, and the handler must retain full control of the animal at all times while on University property. The animal must be in an animal carrier or controlled by a harness, leash or tether, unless these devices interfere with the animal’s work, the individual’s disability prevents using these devices, or the animal is an ESA within the handler’s own dwelling. In those cases, the handler must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls.

5.6.2 Animals may not be left unattended at any time on University property, except for service animals left in the handler’s University residence or private office space or ESA’s left in the handler’s dwelling unit.  The service animal or ESA may be left unattended only for reasonable periods of time, as determined by the appropriate University staff based on the totality of the circumstances. The University may request impoundment of an ESA or service animal left for longer than a reasonable period of time. Owners of impounded animals will be held responsible for payment of any impound and/or license fees required to secure the release of their animals.

5.6.3 A handler who leaves his or her service animal or ESA unattended for longer than a reasonable period of time will receive one warning, and if the behavior occurs a second time, the University reserves the right to require the handler to remove the animal from campus and to prohibit the animal from being permitted back onto University property.

5.6.4 All handlers are responsible for compliance with state and local laws concerning animals (including registration, vaccinations, and tags), for controlling their animals, for cleaning up any waste created by the animal, and for any damage caused by the animal to individuals or property while on University property.

6. PROCEDURES

Specific procedures regarding the presence of animals in UConn Health clinical practice and patient care areas are outlined in the UConn Health Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals.

6.1 Employees Requesting Permission for Service Animals or ESA’s

6.1.1 Workplace Accommodation

Employees and all others performing work for the University who seek the presence of a service animal or an ESA as a workplace accommodation must contact the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Case Manager at the Department of Human Resources in advance of reporting for work with the animal. For service animals, the individual may be asked whether the animal is needed because of a disability, and what work or task(s) the animal has been trained to perform.

For ESA’s, the ADA Case Manager will determine whether the request represents a reasonable accommodation for a documented disability. The terms of the approval, including where the ESA will and will not be permitted, will be determined and documented by the ADA Case Manager, after the facilitation of an interactive accommodations process with the employee and their supervisor(s). This process must occur before any employee can bring an ESA into the workplace. The ADA Case Manager may be contacted at (860) 486-2036 or hr@uconn.edu. Information related to the ADA accommodations process for employees, is contained online: http://hr.uconn.edu/ada-compliance/.

UConn Health employees must contact the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) in advance of reporting for work with the animal. OIE may be contacted at (860) 679-3563 or equity@uconn.edu.  Information related to the ADA accommodations process for UCH employees is contained online: http://equity.uconn.edu/accessibility/


6.1.2. Residential Accommodation

Employees who reside on University property and who wish to have an ESA in their University housing as an accommodation for a disability must request the University’s permission to have the ESA in University housing. Permission will be granted only as an accommodation for a documented disability and must be arranged through the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Case Manager at the Department of Human Resources prior to bringing the animal into University housing. The ADA Case Manager will determine whether the request represents a reasonable accommodation for a documented disability and should be granted.

The employee is not allowed to take an ESA into any other controlled spaces, including but not limited to the employee’s work area, unless the employee has received express authorization to do so from the University. The ADA Case Manager may be contacted at (860) 486-2036 or hr@uconn.edu. Information related to the ADA accommodations process for employees is contained online: http://hr.uconn.edu/ada-compliance/.


6.2 Students Requesting Permission for Service Animals or ESA’s

6.2.1. Service Animals
Students are not required to receive permission from the University prior to bringing a service animal onto University property. The student may be asked whether the animal is needed because of a disability, and what work or task(s) the animal has been trained to perform.

If a student with a service animal plans to reside on campus, the student must notify the University of the need for a service animal’s presence in advance of beginning residence on University property with the animal. Such notification allows the University to make appropriate arrangements, offer any necessary assistance prior to the student’s arrival on campus, and to notify Public Safety of the animal’s presence in case of an emergency. Students should contact Residential Life prior to bringing the animal into their housing at livingoncampus@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2926. Students may also visit http://www.reslife.uconn.edu for further information.

If a student needs any other accommodations while attending the University, documentation of the disability and a request for accommodations must be made under the procedures found at http://www.csd.uconn.edu.  Students may also visit the Center for Students with Disabilities in Wilbur Cross, Room 204, or contact (860) 486-2020 or email csd@uconn.edu for further information related to accommodations.

UConn Health students may contact the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) for any questions related to service animals, ESA’s, or more generally related to accommodations.  OIE may be contacted at (860) 679-3563 or equity@uconn.edu.


6.2.2. Emotional Support Animals (ESA’s)
Permission to have an ESA may be granted only as an accommodation for a documented disability and must be arranged in advance through the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD). CSD will determine whether the request represents a reasonable accommodation for a documented disability and should be granted. In making that determination, CSD (in connection with Residential Life for those students residing in residence halls), will consider:

  • The size of the animal
  • Whether the animal’s presence would force another individual from that individual’s housing (e.g., serious allergies)
  • Whether the animal’s presence would violate individuals’ rights to peace and quiet enjoyment
  • Whether the animal is housebroken or able to live with others
  • Direct threat (currently or in the past) to the individual or others
  • Past excessive damage to housing caused by the animal

A request for an accommodation must be made under the procedures found at http://www.csd.uconn.edu.  Students may also visit the Center for Students with Disabilities in Wilbur Cross, Room 204, or contact (860) 486-2020 or email csd@uconn.edu.

If approved, a student must have advance communication with Residential Life prior to bringing the animal into their housing. Students may contact Residential Life at livingoncampus@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2926. Students may also visit http://www.reslife.uconn.edu.

Students are not allowed to take ESA’s in or on any controlled spaces other than their privately assigned living accommodations without specific advance authorization from CSD.  ESA’s cannot be left overnight in University housing to be cared for by anyone other than the handler absent permission from Residential Life. The handler must clean up after the animal, ensure that the animal does not disturb the peace and quiet enjoyment of others, and otherwise ensure that the animal is well cared for.

6.3 Visitors
Visitors are not required to receive permission from the University prior to bringing a service animal onto University property. The visitor may be asked whether the animal is needed because of a disability, and what work or task(s) the animal has been trained to perform.

A visitor may contact the Office of Institutional Equity at equity@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2943 (Storrs and Regional Campuses); (860) 679-3563 (UConn Health) in advance if the visitor has any questions about the rules concerning the presence of a service animal or a service animal in training (as outlined in Section 5.3) at a specific event or in a specific location on campus.

7.  Appeals and Grievances
Any individual who feels that he or she has been unfairly denied the ability to bring or maintain an animal on University property, may contact the Office of Institutional Equity at equity@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2943 (Storrs and Regional Campuses); (860) 679-3563 (UConn Health) or refer to http://www.equity.uconn.edu  for further information.

8. Violations of Policy / Removal of Animal / Disruptive Animals
Access to University property may be restricted or revoked under the circumstances outlined below. Restrictions or exclusions will be considered on a case-by-case basis. The University reserves the right to remove or exclude an approved animal from University property if:

  1. The animal poses a direct threat to health and safety
  2. The handler does not maintain control of the animal, including but not limited to during any interactions with other animals
  3. The presence of an animal fundamentally alters a University program
  4. Improper/Inadequate care of the animal is exhibited, including if the animal is not housebroken
  5. Damage or harm is caused by the animal
  6. The handler violates any of the responsibilities as outlined in Section 5.6 of this policy

If the presence of an animal poses a direct threat to the health and safety of others, the University reserves the right to remove or exclude an animal from University property. In such a situation, Public Safety may be contacted to assist in the removal of the animal. In particular, if a handler’s animal is disruptive in the classroom, the instructor may ask the handler and their animal to leave the classroom immediately. If a handler’s animal is disruptive in the workplace, the handler’s supervisor may ask the handler and their animal to leave the workspace immediately. If a handler’s animal is disruptive at a University event, the event organizer may ask the handler and their animal to leave the event immediately.

Questions about a disruptive animal should be directed to the following:

  • Center for Students with Disabilities (animals in the classroom):
  • Department of Human Resources (animals in the workplace):
    • Contact (860) 486-2036 or email hr@uconn.edu
    • UConn Health HR Contact: (860) 679-2426
  • UConn Health Contact (animals in practice areas, including JDH):
    • Contact appropriate medical staff (i.e. Supervisor or Nursing Manager)
  • Residential Life (animals in the residence halls):
  • Office of Institutional Equity (all other questions, including regarding visitors)
    • Contact (860) 486-2943 (Storrs and Regional Campuses); (860) 679-3563 (UConn Health) or email equity@uconn.edu

9. Exclusions

This policy does not apply to:

  • Fish in aquariums no larger than ten gallons as follows:
    • Within University housing, such aquariums are allowed without advance notice or permission;
    • Within employee workspaces, such aquariums are allowed only with the express advance, written authorization of the handler’s manager/supervisor. At any time, a manager may revoke approval for such an aquarium, requiring its immediate removal from the workspace; and
    • The handler has responsibility for maintaining the aquarium in a clean and sanitary manner and for any damage caused by the aquarium. Animals other than fish are not allowed in such aquariums;
  • University-maintained fish in aquariums of any size located in waiting rooms or other public areas of UConn Health facilities and maintained by UConn Health, including John Dempsey Hospital and University Medical Group;
  • Animals used in Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approved University research, education or testing Animals used in classes on campus, based on requests by faculty for such use. Such requests may be granted only upon showing that the presence of the animal is for a bona fide educational purpose, and such purpose is clearly delineated on the course syllabus as a central topic in class.  Prior permission must be obtained from the academic unit head, the dean and/or the Provost’s Office and the IACUC;
  • Requests for the presence of animals within controlled spaces for non-educational purposes must be fully reviewed and approved by the Provost’s Office or the Vice President of Student Affairs, or their designees. Such requests may be approved only upon a showing that there exists a well-developed program with defined parameters, to be administered by appropriately trained staff;
  • Animals used in police, search and rescue operations on University property;
  • Animals trained for and used in a clinical therapeutic setting on campus, such as a counseling center;
  • Appearances by the official mascot of the University and/or official mascots of other institutions as approved by event organizers; and
  • Animals accompanying individuals in clinical practice or patient care areas at UConn Health pursuant to the UConn Health Clinical Practice Procedures Regarding Animals.

Any questions pertaining to this policy may be addressed to the Office of Institutional Equity at equity@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2943.

 

Lactation Policy

Title: UConn Lactation Policy
Policy Owner: Human Resources and Office of Institutional Equity
Applies to: Employees, Graduate Assistants, Students
Campus Applicability: All Campuses, Including UConn Health
Effective Date: 12/20/2016
For More Information, Contact Human Resources and Student Health Services/Student Services
Contact Information: Storrs/Regionals: (860) 486-3034 (HR) and (860) 486-0765 (SHS)
UConn Health: (860) 679-2426 (HR and (860) 679-1364 (Student Services Center)
Official Website: http://hr.uconn.edu/worklife/


Reason for Policy

The purpose of this policy is to provide employees and students who are breastfeeding a private place and reasonable break time to express breast milk for their nursing child.  This policy is in accordance with relevant laws and regulations regarding breastfeeding in the workplace.

Applies to

All breastfeeding employees and students on the Storrs, UConn Health and Regional campuses.

Definitions:

Lactation Area: A space on the University of Connecticut campus that is either dedicated or temporarily established to accommodate the needs of those who are breastfeeding. The room must be a clean, private (the ability to be shielded from view and free from intrusion), comfortable space with electrical outlet, chair, table for breast pump, and nearby access to clean running water.

Lactation Breaks: Breaks during the work day for employees who have requested lactation accommodations.

Policy Statement

The University of Connecticut is committed to providing a supportive environment that enables employees and students to express breast milk in a private place, with reasonable break time and in a location within five minutes of their work and study areas.

Consistent with Connecticut Laws (Chapter 939, Section 53-34b and Chapter 814c, Section 46a-64), a person may breastfeed their infant in any public or private location on campus where they and their child are authorized to be. This includes all campus locations open to the public and other campus locations where infants are allowed.

Additionally, Connecticut law (Connecticut General Statutes, Section 31-40w) Breastfeeding in the Workplace states that employers must allow employees to breastfeed or express breast milk at work.

Consistent with federal law, the University of Connecticut shall provide to employee breastfeeding persons reasonable break time (“lactation break”) as well as space that is shielded from view and free from intrusion in order to breastfeed their infants or to express breast milk.

The University of Connecticut prohibits discrimination, harassment, and retaliation against breastfeeding persons who exercise their rights under this policy.  For more information, see University Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment and Related Interpersonal Violence.

Enforcement

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University Policies and applicable collective bargaining agreements.

Policy History

Adopted 12/20/2016

Procedures

Storrs and Regional Campuses: http://policy.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/243/2016/12/UConn-Lactation-Procedures_final-draft-12-20-16.pdf

UConn Health: http://policy.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/243/2017/02/UConn-Health-Lactation-Procedures.pdf 

 

Tuition Discount Policy

Title: Tuition Discount Policy
Policy Owner: Office of the Provost
Applies to: Outside Entities Meeting the Criteria within the Policy
Campus Applicability: Storrs and Regional Campuses
Effective Date: June 28, 2012
For More Information, Contact Office of the Provost
Contact Information: (860) 486-4037
Official Website: http://provost.uconn.edu

The University of Connecticut recognizes that establishing partnerships with other entities may
be beneficial to the University and enhance the University’s ability to fulfill its mission. One
form of partnership can be a relationship in which another entity sponsors the education of
multiple University students, particularly when that sponsorship is coupled with other
relationships between the University and the entity.

Accordingly, it is the policy of the Board of Trustees to permit the University to enter into
Tuition Discount Agreements with other entities provided that such Agreements meet the following
criteria:

  • Parties: The University of Connecticut and any business or nonprofit entity.
  • Discount Permitted: Up to five percent (5%). The Agreement may specify a maximum total
    dollar discount for the life of the Agreement.
  • Discount applicable to: Graduate Tuition and Fee Equivalents approved by the Board of Trustees.
  • Programs eligible: Regular academic degree programs offered by any school or department of the
    University but not including undergraduate programs.
  • Minimum Expenditure: In order to be eligible, the contracting entity must have spent at least one
    million dollars in a prior fiscal year in Tuition and Fee Equivalents for graduate and
    undergraduate education. The Tuition Discount Agreement can then be entered into for the following
    fiscal year.
  • Maximum Duration: Agreements shall be for a maximum term of two (2) years but may be renewed with
    Board approval. The Agreement may provide for a limit on the total aggregate dollar discount for
    the life of the Agreement.
  • Early termination: Each Agreement may provide that if the amount of Tuition and Fee Equivalents
    incurred by the contracting entity before discount falls below one million dollars in a particular
    year or on a rolling average basis, that the University may cancel the Agreement for subsequent
    years.
  • Application of the discount: The discount will be applied at the time of registration. The
    Agreement shall provide a mechanism for assuring that the tuition has been paid by the contracting
    entity.
  • In determining whether or not to enter into an Agreement, the University will take into account
    whether the entity has demonstrated a commitment to support the University through past
    philanthropy, providing student internships, collaboration on research, entering into fee for
    service arrangements or in other ways.

All such Agreements must be approved by the Board of Trustees before they are effective. Nothing in
this policy creates a right in any entity, nor an obligation on the University, to enter into such
Agreement. The Board of Trustees retains sole discretion with regard to all proposed
Agreements.

Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Related Interpersonal Violence

Including Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment, Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Complicity, Retaliation and Inappropriate Amorous Relationships

 

Title: Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Related Interpersonal Violence
Policy Owner: The Office of Institutional Equity
Applies to: Students, All Employees, Contractors, Vendors, Visitors, Guests and Other Third Parties
Campus Applicability: All
Effective Date: January 1, 2016
For More Information, Contact Office of Institutional Equity
Contact Information: (860) 486-2943 & (860) 679-3563
Official Website: http://www.equity.uconn.edu and http://titleix.uconn.edu/
A PDF, Printer Friendly copy of this policy is available at: http://policy.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/243/2016/07/2016-07-1-DiscHarassment.pdf
Related Documents:

CONTENTS

I.     STATEMENT OF POLICY

II.   TO WHOM THIS POLICY APPLIES

III. APPLICABLE PROCEDURES UNDER THIS POLICY

  1. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A STUDENT
  2. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS AN EMPLOYEE
  3. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS BOTH A STUDENT AND AN EMPLOYEE
  4. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A THIRD PARTY
  5. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A UCH STUDENT, EMPLOYEE OR THIRD PARTY

IV. TITLE IX COORDINATOR

V. UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY

VI.EMPLOYEE REPORTING RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. TITLE IX REPORTING OBLIGATIONS
  2. CLERY REPORTING OBLIGATIONS
  3. CHILD ABUSE REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

VII.    COMPLAINANT OPTIONS FOR REPORTING PROHIBITED CONDUCT

  1. REPORTING TO LAW ENFORCEMENT
  2. REPORTING TO THE UNIVERSITY

VIII.   ACCESSING CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

  1. REMEDIAL AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES
  2. INTERIM ACTIONS

IX. PROHIBITED CONDUCT UNDER THIS POLICY

  1. DISCRIMINATION
  2. DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT
  3. SEXUAL OR GENDER-BASED HARASSMENT
  4. SEXUAL ASSAULT
  5. SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
  6. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE
  7. STALKING
  8. RETALIATION
  9. COMPLICITY

X. INAPPROPRIATE AMOROUS RELATIONSHIPS

  1. INSTRUCTIONAL/STUDENT CONTEXT
  2. EMPLOYMENT CONTEXT

XI. PREVENTION, AWARENESS AND TRAINING PROGRAMS

XII.    OBLIGATION TO PROVIDE TRUTHFUL INFORMATION

XIII.   RELATED POLICIES

  1. STUDENTS
  2. EMPLOYEES

XIV.   POLICY REVIEW

I. STATEMENT OF POLICY

The University of Connecticut (the “University”) is committed to maintaining a safe and non-discriminatory learning, living and working environment for all members of the University community – students, employees, and visitors.  Academic and professional excellence can exist only when each member of our community is assured an atmosphere of safety and mutual respect.  All members of the University community are responsible for the maintenance of an environment in which people are free to learn and work without fear of discrimination, discriminatory harassment or interpersonal violence.  Discrimination diminishes individual dignity and impedes equal employment and educational opportunities.

The University does not unlawfully discriminate in any of its education or employment programs and activities on the basis of an individual’s race, color, ethnicity, religious creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, genetic information, physical or mental disability (including learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and past or present history of mental illness), veteran’s status, prior conviction of a crime, workplace hazards to the reproductive system, gender identity or expression, or membership in any other protected classes as set forth in state or federal law.  To that end, this Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment and Related Interpersonal Violence, Including Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment, Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Complicity, Retaliation and Inappropriate Amorous Relationships (the “Policy”) prohibits specific forms of behavior that violate state and federal laws, including but not limited to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”), the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (“VAWA”), and related state and federal anti-discrimination laws. Such behavior may also require the University to fulfill certain reporting obligations under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (the “Clery Act”), as amended by VAWA, and Connecticut state law regarding reporting suspected child abuse and neglect.

The University prohibits discrimination, as well as discriminatory harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence, stalking, sexual or gender-based harassment, complicity in the commission of any act prohibited by this Policy, retaliation against a person for the good faith reporting of any of these forms of conduct or participation in any investigation or proceeding under this Policy (collectively, “Prohibited Conduct”[1]).  These forms of Prohibited Conduct are unlawful and undermine the mission and values of our academic community. In addition, inappropriate amorous relationships with employees in positions of authority can undermine the University’s mission when those in positions of authority abuse or appear to abuse their authority.

The University adopts this Policy with a commitment to: (1) eliminating, preventing, and addressing the effects of Prohibited Conduct; (2) fostering a safe and respectful University community; (3) cultivating a climate where all individuals are well-informed and supported in reporting Prohibited Conduct; (4) providing a fair and impartial process for all parties in the investigation and resolution of such reports; and (5) identifying the standards by which violations of this Policy will be evaluated and disciplinary action may be imposed. In addition, the University conducts ongoing prevention, awareness, and training programs for employees and students to facilitate the goals of this Policy.

A student or employee determined by the University to have committed an act of Prohibited Conduct is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including separation from the University. Third Parties who commit acts of Prohibited Conduct may have their relationships with the University terminated and/or their privileges of being on University premises withdrawn.

It is the responsibility of every member of the University community to foster an environment free of Prohibited Conduct. All members of the University community are encouraged to take reasonable and prudent actions to prevent or stop an act of Prohibited Conduct. The University will support and assist community members who take such actions.

Retaliation against any individual who, in good faith, reports or participates in the reporting, investigation, or adjudication of Prohibited Conduct is strictly forbidden.

This Policy applies to all reports of Prohibited Conduct occurring on or after the effective date of this Policy. Where the date of the Prohibited Conduct precedes the effective date of this Policy, the definitions of misconduct in effect at the time of the alleged incident(s) will be used. The procedures under this Policy, however, will be used to investigate and resolve all reports made on or after the effective date of this Policy, regardless of when the incident(s) occurred.

II.   TO WHOM THIS POLICY APPLIES

This Policy applies to: students as defined in UConn’s Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code (“Students”); University employees, consisting of all full-time and part-time faculty, University Staff (including special payroll employees), UConn Health employees, professional research staff, and post-doctoral fellows (“Employees”); and contractors, vendors, visitors, guests or other third parties (“Third Parties”). This Policy pertains to acts of Prohibited Conduct committed by or against Students, Employees and Third Parties when:

  1. the conduct occurs on campus or other property owned or controlled by the University;
  1. the conduct occurs in the context of a University employment or education program or activity, including, but not limited to, University-sponsored study abroad, research, on-line, or internship programs; or
  1. the conduct occurs outside the context of a University employment or education program or activity, but has continuing adverse effects on or creates a hostile environment for Students, Employees or Third Parties while on campus or other property owned or controlled by the University or in any University employment or education program or activity.

III.  APPLICABLE PROCEDURES UNDER THIS POLICY

The specific procedures for reporting, investigating, and resolving Prohibited Conduct are based upon the nature of the respondent’s relationship to the University (Student, Employee, or Third Party). Each set of procedures referenced below is guided by the same principles of fairness and respect for complainants and respondents. “Complainant” means the individual who presents as the victim of any Prohibited Conduct under this Policy, regardless of whether that person makes a report or seeks action under this Policy.[2] “Respondent” means the individual who has been accused of violating this Policy.

The procedures referenced below provide for prompt and equitable response to reports of Prohibited Conduct. The procedures designate specific timeframes for major stages of the process, provide for thorough and impartial investigations that afford the Complainant and Respondent notice and an opportunity to present witnesses and evidence, and assure equal and timely access to the information that will be used in determining whether a Policy violation has occurred. The University applies the Preponderance of the Evidence standard when determining whether this Policy has been violated. “Preponderance of the Evidence” means that it is more likely than not that a Policy violation occurred.

A. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A STUDENT

The procedures for responding to reports of Prohibited Conduct committed by Students are detailed in Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code (“Student Code”) (http://community.uconn.edu/the-student-code-preamble/).

B.  WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS AN EMPLOYEE

The procedures for responding to reports of Prohibited Conduct committed by Employees are detailed in OIE’s Complaint Processes (http://www.equity.uconn.edu/discrimination/complaint-procedures/).

C.  WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS BOTH A STUDENT AND AN EMPLOYEE

  • The Student-Respondent procedures will apply if the Respondent’s primary status is as a Student;
  • The Employee-Respondent procedures will apply if the Respondent’s primary status is as an Employee.
  • If there is a question as to the predominant role of the Respondent, the University will determine which of the procedures applies based on the facts and circumstances (such as which role predominates in the context of the Prohibited Conduct). The Student-Respondent procedures typically will apply to graduate students except in those cases where the graduate student’s assistantship role predominated in the context of the Prohibited Conduct. Further, where a Respondent is both a Student and an Employee (including but not limited to graduate students), the Respondent may be subject to any of the sanctions applicable to Students or Employees.

D. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A THIRD PARTY
The University’s ability to take appropriate corrective action against a Third Party will be determined by the nature of the relationship of the Third Party to the University. The University will determine the appropriate manner of resolution consistent with the University’s commitment to a prompt and equitable process under federal law, federal guidance, and this Policy.

E. WHERE THE RESPONDENT IS A UCONN HEALTH STUDENT, EMPLOYEE OR THIRD PARTY Parties should contact the UConn Health Office of Institutional Equity by calling (860) 679-3563 or email: equity@uconn.edu.

IV.  TITLE IX COORDINATOR

Under Title IX:

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.

The Title IX Coordinator is charged with monitoring the University’s compliance with Title IX, ensuring appropriate education and training, coordinating the University’s investigation, response, and resolution of all reports under this Policy and ensuring appropriate actions to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects. The Office of Institutional Equity oversees reports involving Students, Employees and Third Parties.  The University has also designated Deputy Title IX Coordinators who may assist the Title IX Coordinator in the discharge of these responsibilities. The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators receive ongoing appropriate training to discharge their responsibilities.

Concerns about the University’s application of Title IX may be addressed to the Title IX Coordinator.  Additionally, concerns about the University’s application of Title VII and/or other federal and state anti-discrimination laws may be addressed to the Office of Institutional Equity.

The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators can be contacted by telephone, email, or in person during regular office hours:

Elizabeth A. Conklin
Associate Vice President, Office of Institutional Equity
Title IX Coordinator
Wood Hall, First Floor
elizabeth.conklin@uconn.edu
(860) 486-2943

Sarah Chipman
Director of Investigations, Office of Institutional Equity
Deputy Title IX Coordinator
Wood Hall, First Floor
sarah.chipman@uconn.edu
(860) 486-2943

External reporting options include the United States Department of Education, Clery Act Compliance Team (at clery@ed.gov); the United States Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (at OCR@ed.gov or (800) 421-3481); the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (at info@eeoc.gov or (800) 669-4000); and/or the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities ((800)-477-5737).

V. UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY

The University is committed to protecting the privacy of all individuals involved in the investigation and resolution of a report under this Policy. The University also is committed to providing assistance to help Students, Employees and Third Parties make informed choices. With respect to any report under this Policy, the University will take reasonable efforts to protect the privacy of participants, in accordance with applicable state and federal law, while balancing the need to gather information to assess the report and to take steps to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects.

Privacy and confidentiality have distinct meanings under this Policy.

Privacy: Privacy means that information related to a report of Prohibited Conduct will be shared with a limited circle of University Employees who “need to know” in order to assist in support of the Complainant and in the assessment, investigation, and resolution of the report. All Employees who are involved in the University’s response to reports of Prohibited Conduct receive specific training and guidance about sharing and safeguarding private information in accordance with state and federal law.

The privacy of Student education records will be protected in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”), as outlined in the University’s FERPA policy.(http://policy.uconn.edu/2011/05/24/ferpa-policy/) The privacy of an individual’s medical and related records generally is protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) and/or state laws governing protection of medical records. Access to an Employee’s personnel records may be restricted in accordance with Connecticut law and applicable collective bargaining agreements.

Confidentiality: Confidentiality exists in the context of laws that protect certain relationships, including with medical and clinical care providers (and those who provide administrative services related to the provision of medical and clinical care), mental health providers, counselors, and ordained clergy, all of whom may engage in confidential communications under Connecticut law. The University has designated individuals who have the ability to have privileged communications as “Confidential Employees.” When information is shared by an individual with a Confidential Employee or a community professional with the same legal protections, the Confidential Employee (and/or such community professional) cannot reveal the information to any third party except where required or permitted by law. For example, information may be disclosed when: (i) the individual gives written consent for its disclosure; (ii) there is a concern that the individual will likely cause serious physical harm to self or others; or (iii) the information concerns conduct involving suspected abuse or neglect of a minor under the age of 18.

VI. EMPLOYEE REPORTING RESPONSIBILITIES

A.      TITLE IX REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

Most University employees are required to immediately report information about certain types of Prohibited Conduct involving any Student to the University’s Office of Institutional Equity.[3]  An Employee’s responsibility to report under this Policy is governed by his/her role at the University.  The University designates every Employee as either a Confidential Employee or a Responsible Employee.

Confidential Employee: Any Employee who is entitled under state law to have privileged communications.  Confidential Employees will not disclose information about Prohibited Conduct to the University without the permission of the Student or Employee (subject to the exceptions set forth in the Confidentiality section of this Policy). Confidential Employees at the University of Connecticut include:

      •  Student Health Services

      •  Counseling and Mental Health Services

      •  Employee Assistance Program

Responsible Employee: Any Employee who is not a Confidential Employee, and certain categories of student employees. Responsible Employees are required to immediately report to the University’s Office of Institutional Equity all relevant details (obtained directly or indirectly) about an incident of Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence and/or Stalking (as defined in Section IX, below) that involves any Student as a Complainant, Respondent, and/or witness, including dates, times, locations, and names of parties and witnesses. [4] Reporting is required when the Responsible Employee knows (by reason of a direct or indirect disclosure) or should have known of such Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, and/or Stalking.  Responsible Employees include (but are not necessarily limited to) Faculty and Staff, Resident Assistants, Graduate Teaching Assistants, Graduate Research Assistants, and any student-employees serving as Campus Security Authorities (CSAs) when disclosures are made to any of them in their capacities as Employees.  This manner of reporting may help inform the University of the general extent and nature of Prohibited Conduct on and off campus so the University can track patterns, evaluate the scope of the problem, and formulate appropriate campus-wide responses.

Responsible Employees are not required to report information disclosed (1) at public awareness events (e.g., “Take Back the Night,” candlelight vigils, protests, “survivor speak-outs” or other public forums in which Students may disclose incidents of Prohibited Conduct; collectively, “Public Awareness Events”); (2) during a Student’s participation as a subject in an Institutional Review Board-approved human subjects research protocol (“IRB Research”); or (3) as part of coursework submitted to an instructor  in connection with a course assignment.  Even in the absence of such obligation, all Employees are encouraged to contact the Title IX Coordinator if they become aware of information that suggests a safety risk to the University community or any member thereof. The University may provide information about Students’ Title IX and/or other civil rights and about available University and community resources and support at Public Awareness Events, however, and Institutional Review Boards may, in appropriate cases, require researchers to provide such information to all Student subjects of IRB Research.

Dean, Director, Department Head and Supervisor Responsibility to Report Prohibited Conduct Where Either the Complainant or the Respondent is an Employee.  Under this Policy, Deans, Directors, Department Heads and Supervisors are required to report to the Office of Institutional Equity all relevant details about an incident of Prohibited Conduct[5] where either the Complainant or the Respondent is an Employee.  Reporting is required when such Deans, Directors, Department Heads and Supervisors know (by reason of direct or indirect disclosure) or should have known of such Prohibited Conduct.

All University Employees are strongly encouraged to report to the law enforcement any conduct that could potentially present a danger to the community or may be a crime under Connecticut law.

B.CLERY REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

Under the Clery Act, certain University employees are designated as Campus Security Authorities.  CSAs generally include individuals with significant responsibility for campus security or student and campus activities.  Based on information reported to CSAs, the University includes statistics about certain criminal offenses in its annual security report and provides those statistics to the United States Department of Education in a manner that does not include any personally identifying information about individuals involved in an incident. The Clery Act also requires the University to issue timely warnings to the University community about certain reported crimes that may pose a serious or continuing threat to Students and Employees. Consistent with the Clery Act, the University withholds the names and other personally identifying information of Complainants when issuing timely warnings to the University community.

C.      CHILD ABUSE REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

All University Employees except student employees are mandated reporters of child abuse or neglect as defined by Connecticut General Statutes Section 17a-101(b) and must comply with Connecticut’s mandated reporting laws.  See Connecticut General Statutes Sections 17a-101a to 17a-101d. All University Employees should refer to UConn’s Protection of Minors and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect Policy http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=6754) for detailed definitions and reporting information.

VII.   COMPLAINANT OPTIONS FOR REPORTING PROHIBITED CONDUCT 

There are two channels for reporting Prohibited Conduct. A Complainant may choose to report to the University and/or to law enforcement. These two reporting options are not mutually exclusive.  Therefore, Complainants may choose to pursue both the University process and the criminal process concurrently. The University will support Complainants in understanding, assessing and pursuing these options.

The first priority for any individual should be personal safety and well-being.  In addition to seeking immediate medical care, the University encourages all individuals to seek immediate assistance from 911, UConn Police, and/or local law enforcement.  This is the best option to ensure preservation of evidence.  The University also strongly urges that law enforcement be notified immediately in situations that may present imminent or ongoing danger.

A. REPORTING TO LAW ENFORCEMENT

Conduct that violates this Policy may also constitute a crime under the laws of the jurisdiction in which the incident occurred. For example, the State of Connecticut criminalizes and punishes some forms of Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking, and Physical Assault.  See Title 53a of the Connecticut General Statutes for the State of Connecticut’s Penal Code (https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_950.htm).  Whether or not any specific incident of Prohibited Conduct may constitute a crime is a decision made solely by law enforcement.  Similarly, the decision to arrest any individual for engaging in any incident of Prohibited Conduct is determined solely by law enforcement and not the University. Such decisions are based on a number of factors, including availability of admissible evidence.

Complainants have the right to notify or decline to notify law enforcement. In keeping with its commitment to take all appropriate steps to eliminate, prevent, and remedy all Prohibited Conduct, the University urges Complainants (or others who become aware of potential criminal conduct) to report Prohibited Conduct immediately to local law enforcement by contacting:

i. 911 (for emergencies)

ii. University Police (for non-emergencies)

1. Storrs (860) 486-4800

2. Avery Point (860) 405-9088

3. Greater Hartford (860) 570-5173

4. Law School (860) 570-5173

5. Stamford (203) 223-4270

6. Torrington (860) 236-9950

7. Waterbury (203) 236-9950

8. UConn Health (860) 679-2121

iii. State Policy (for conduct occurring off campus in Connecticut) (800) 308-7633

Police have unique legal authority, including the power to seek and execute search warrants, collect forensic evidence, make arrests, and assist in seeking protective and restraining orders. Although a police report may be made at any time, Complainants should be aware that delayed reporting may diminish law enforcement’s ability to take certain actions, including collecting forensic evidence and making arrests. The University will assist Complainants in notifying law enforcement if they choose to do so.  Under limited circumstances posing a threat to health or safety of any University community member, the University may independently notify law enforcement.

B. REPORTING TO THE UNIVERSITY

Complainants (or others who become aware of an incident of Prohibited Conduct) are encouraged to report the incident to the University through the following reporting options:

By contacting the Office of Institutional Equity by telephone, email, or in person during regular office hours (8am-5pm, M-F):

Office of Institutional Equity (Storrs and Regionals)
Wood Hall, First Floor
241 Glenbrook Road
Storrs, Connecticut
(860) 486-2943
equity@uconn.edu
www.titleix.uconn.edu
www.equity.uconn.edu

Office of Institutional Equity (UConn Health)
16 Munson Road, 4th Floor
Farmington, Connecticut
(860) 679-3563
equity@uconn.edu
http://equity.uconn.edu

There is no time limit for a Complainant to report Prohibited Conduct to the University under this Policy;[6]  however, the University’s ability to respond may diminish over time, as evidence may erode, memories may fade, and Respondents may no longer be affiliated with the University. If the Respondent is no longer a Student or an Employee, the University will provide reasonably appropriate remedial measures, assist the Complainant in identifying external reporting options, and take reasonable steps to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects.

The University will not pursue disciplinary action against Complainants or witnesses for disclosure of illegal personal consumption of drugs or alcohol where such disclosures are made in connection with a good faith report or investigation of Prohibited Conduct.

VIII.       ACCESSING CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

The University offers a wide range of resources for all Students and Employees to provide support and guidance in response to any incident of Prohibited Conduct.  Comprehensive information on accessing University and community resources is contained online at the following sites:

  • Sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence, sexual or gender-based harassment, and stalking: titleix.uconn.edu
  • Discrimination and discriminatory harassment where the Respondent is an Employee or Third Party: equity.uconn.edu
  • Related Student Code violations where the Respondent is a Student: community.uconn.edu

Available resources include: emergency and ongoing assistance; health, mental health, and victim-advocacy services; options for reporting Prohibited Conduct to the University and/or law enforcement; and available support with academics, housing, and employment.

A. REMEDIAL AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES

The University offers a wide range of resources for Students and Employees, whether as Complainants or Respondents, to provide support and guidance throughout the initiation, investigation, and resolution of a report of Prohibited Conduct. The University will offer reasonable and appropriate measures to protect a Complainant and facilitate the Complainant’s continued access to University employment or education programs and activities. These measures may be both remedial (designed to address a Complainant’s safety and well-being and continued access to educational opportunities) or protective (designed to reduce the risk of harm to an individual or community). Remedial and protective measures, which may be temporary or permanent, may include no-contact directives, residence modifications, academic modifications and support, work schedule modifications, suspension from employment, and pre-disciplinary leave (with or without pay). Remedial measures are available regardless of whether a Complainant pursues a complaint or investigation under this Policy.

The University will maintain the privacy of any remedial and protective measures provided under this Policy to the extent practicable and will promptly address any violation of the protective measures. The University has the discretion to impose and/or modify any interim measure based on all available information, and is available to meet with a Complainant or Respondent to address any concerns about the provision of interim measures.

The University will provide reasonable remedial and protective measures to Third Parties as appropriate and available, taking into account the role of the Third Party and the nature of any contractual relationship with the University.

B. INTERIM ACTIONS

In addition to remedial and protective measures, an interim action may be imposed on a Student or student organization in accordance with The Student Code prior to the resolution of an investigation. Such action may be taken when, in the professional judgment of a University official, a threat of imminent harm to persons or property exists. Interim administrative action is not a sanction. It is taken in an effort to protect the safety and well-being of the Complainant and/or Respondent, of others, of the University, or of property. Interim administrative action is preliminary in nature; it is in effect only until there is a resolution of the student conduct matter.

University officials designated to impose an interim action through The Student Code include, but are not limited to, staff in Community Standards, Residential Life, and the Office of Institutional Equity.

IX.   PROHIBITED CONDUCT UNDER THIS POLICY[7]

Conduct under this Policy is prohibited regardless of the sex, sexual orientation and/or gender identity/expression of the Complainant or Respondent. Prohibited Conduct includes the following specifically defined forms of behavior: Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual or Gender-Based Harassment, Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Complicity, and Retaliation.

A. DISCRIMINATION 

Discrimination is any unlawful distinction, preference, or detriment to an individual that is based upon an individual’s race, color, ethnicity, religious creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, genetic information, physical or mental disabilities (including learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, past/present history of a mental disorder), veteran status, prior conviction of a crime, workplace hazards to reproductive systems, gender identity or expression, or membership in other protected classes set forth in state or federal law and that: (1) excludes an individual from participation; (2) denies the individual the benefits of; (3) treats the individual differently; or (4) otherwise adversely affects a term or condition of an individual’s employment, education, living environment or participation in a University program or activity.

Discrimination includes failing to provide reasonable accommodation, consistent with state and federal law, to persons with disabilities.  The University of Connecticut is committed to achieving equal educational and employment opportunity and full participation for persons with disabilities.  See Policy Statement: People with Disabilities (http://policy.uconn.edu/2011/05/24/people-with-disabilities-policy-statement/).

B. DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT

Discriminatory Harassment consists of verbal, physical, electronic or other conduct based upon an individual’s race, color, ethnicity, religious creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, genetic information, physical or mental disabilities (including learning disabilities, intellectual disability, past/present history of a mental disorder), veteran status, prior conviction of a crime, workplace hazards to reproductive systems, gender identity or expression, or membership in other protected classes set forth in state or federal law that interferes with that individual’s educational or employment opportunities, participation in a University program or activity, or receipt of legitimately-requested services under either Hostile Environment Harassment or Quid Pro Quo Harassment, as defined below.

Hostile Environment Harassment: Discriminatory Harassment that is so severe, persistent or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with, limits, deprives, or alters the conditions of education (e.g., admission, academic standing, grades, assignment); employment (e.g., hiring, advancement, assignment); or participation in a University program or activity (e.g., campus housing), when viewed from both a subjective and objective perspective.

In evaluating whether a hostile environment exists, the University will consider the totality of known circumstances, including, but not limited to:

  • The frequency, nature and severity of the conduct;
  • Whether the conduct was physically threatening;
  • The effect of the conduct on the Complainant’s mental or emotional state;
  • Whether the conduct was directed at more than one person;
  • Whether the  conduct  arose  in  the  context  of  other  discriminatory conduct;
  • Whether the conduct unreasonably interfered with the Complainant’s educational or work performance and/or University programs or activities; and
  • Whether the conduct implicates concerns related to academic freedom or protected speech.

A hostile environment can be created by persistent or pervasive conduct or by a single or isolated incident, if sufficiently severe. The more severe the conduct, the less need there is to show a repetitive series of incidents to prove a hostile environment, particularly if the conduct is physical.  An isolated incident, unless sufficiently serious, does not amount to Hostile Environment Harassment.

Quid Pro Quo Harassment: Discriminatory Harassment where submission to or rejection of unwelcome conduct is used, explicitly or implicitly, as the basis for decisions affecting an individual’s education (e.g., admission, academic standing, grades, assignment); employment (e.g., hiring, advancement, assignment); or participation in a University program or activity (e.g., campus housing).

Discriminatory Harassment may take many forms, including verbal acts, name-calling, graphic or written statements (including the use of cell phones or the Internet), or other conduct that may be humiliating or physically threatening.

C. SEXUAL OR GENDER-BASED HARASSMENT

Sexual Harassment is any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other unwanted conduct of a sexual nature, whether verbal, non-verbal, graphic, physical, or otherwise, when the conditions for Hostile Environment Harassment or Quid Pro Quo Harassment are present, as defined above.

Sexual Harassment also may include inappropriate touching, acts of sexual violence, suggestive comments and public display of pornographic or suggestive calendars, posters, or signs where such images are not connected to any academic purpose.  A single incident of Sexual Assault (as defined below) may be sufficiently severe to constitute a hostile environment.

Gender-Based Harassment includes harassment based on gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression, which may include acts of aggression, intimidation, or hostility, whether verbal or non-verbal, graphic, physical, or otherwise, even if the acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature, when the conditions for Hostile Environment Harassment or Quid Pro Quo Harassment are present, as defined above.

D. SEXUAL ASSAULT

Sexual Assault consists of (1) Sexual Contact and/or (2) Sexual Intercourse that occurs without (3) Consent.

  1. Sexual Contact (or attempts to commit) is any intentional touching of the breasts, buttocks, groin or genitals, whether clothed or unclothed, with any object(s) or body part, or, any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner, even where the touching does not involve contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth or other orifice.
  1. Sexual Intercourse (or attempts to commit) is any penetration, however slight, of a bodily orifice with any object(s) or body part. Sexual Intercourse includes vaginal or anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger, or any contact between the mouth of one person and the genitalia of another person.
  1. Consent is an understandable exchange of affirmative words or actions, which indicate a willingness to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Consent must be informed, freely and actively given. It is the responsibility of the initiator to obtain clear and affirmative responses at each stage of sexual involvement. Consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. The lack of a negative response is not consent. An individual who is incapacitated by alcohol and/or other drugs both voluntarily or involuntarily consumed may not give consent. Past consent of sexual activity does not imply ongoing future consent.

Consent cannot be given if any of the following are present: Force, Coercion or Incapacitation.

Force is the use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats) and/or coercion that overcome resistance.

Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. Coercion is more than an effort to persuade, entice, or attract another person to have sex.  Conduct does not constitute coercion unless it wrongfully impairs an individual’s freedom of will to choose whether to participate in the sexual activity.

Incapacitation is a state where an individual cannot make rational, reasonable decisions because of mental or physical helplessness, sleep, unconsciousness, or lack of awareness that sexual activity is taking place.  A person may be incapacitated due to the consumption of alcohol or other drugs, or due to a temporary or permanent physical or mental health condition.  A person who is incapacitated lacks the capacity to give Consent because they cannot understand the “who, what, when, where, why, or how” of their sexual interaction.

The University offers the following guidance on Consent and assessing Incapacitation:

A person who wants to engage in a specific sexual activity is responsible for obtaining Consent for that activity. The lack of a negative response or protest does not constitute Consent. Lack of resistance does not constitute Consent. Silence and/or passivity also do not constitute Consent. Relying solely on non-verbal communication before or during sexual activity can lead to misunderstanding and may result in a violation of this Policy.  It is important not to make assumptions about whether a potential partner is consenting. In order to avoid confusion or ambiguity, participants are encouraged to talk with one another before engaging in sexual activity. If confusion or ambiguity arises during sexual activity, participants are encouraged to stop and clarify a mutual willingness to continue that activity.

Consent to one form of sexual activity does not, by itself, constitute Consent to another form of sexual activity. For example, one should not presume that Consent to oral-genital contact constitutes Consent to vaginal or anal penetration. Consent to sexual activity on a prior occasion does not, by itself, constitute Consent to future sexual activity. In cases of prior relationships, the manner and nature of prior communications between the parties and the context of the relationship may have a bearing on the presence of Consent.

Once Consent has been given, it may be withdrawn at any time. An individual who seeks to withdraw Consent must communicate, through clear words or actions, a decision to cease the sexual activity. Once Consent is withdrawn, the sexual activity must cease immediately.

In evaluating Consent in cases of alleged incapacitation, the University asks two questions: (1) Did the person initiating sexual activity know that the other party was incapacitated? and if not, (2) Should a sober, reasonable person in the same situation have known that the other party was incapacitated? If the answer to either of these questions is “YES,” Consent was absent and the conduct is likely a violation of this Policy.

Incapacitation is a state beyond drunkenness or intoxication. A person is not necessarily incapacitated merely as a result of drinking or using drugs.  A person could be incapacitated due to other reasons which may include: sleep, prescribed or over the counter medication, mental or physical disability.  Alcohol-related incapacity results from a level of alcohol ingestion that is more severe than impairment, being under the influence, drunkenness or intoxication.   The impact of alcohol and other drugs varies from person to person.

One is not expected to be a medical expert in assessing incapacitation. One must look for the common and obvious warning signs that show that a person may be incapacitated or approaching incapacitation. Although every individual may manifest signs of incapacitation differently, evidence of incapacity may be detected from context clues, such as:

  • Slurred or incomprehensible speech;
  • Bloodshot eyes;
  • The smell of alcohol on their breath;
  • Shaky equilibrium or unsteady gait;
  • Vomiting;
  • Incontinence;
  • Combativeness or emotional volatility;
  • Unusual behavior; and/or
  • Unconsciousness

Context clues are important in helping to determine incapacitation. These signs alone do not necessarily indicate incapacitation.  A person who is incapacitated may not be able to understand some or all of the following questions: “Do you know where you are?” “Do you know how you got here?” “Do you know what is happening?” “Do you know who is here with you?

One should be cautious before engaging in Sexual Contact or Sexual Intercourse when either party has been drinking alcohol or using other drugs. The introduction of alcohol or other drugs may create ambiguity for either party as to whether Consent has been sought or given. If one has doubt about either party’s level of intoxication, the safe thing to do is to forego all sexual activity.

Being impaired by alcohol or other drugs is no defense to any violation of this Policy.

E. SEXUAL EXPLOITATION

Sexual Exploitation is purposely or knowingly doing or attempting to do any of the following:

  • Recording or photographing private sexual activity and/or a person’s intimate parts (including genitalia, groin, breasts or buttocks) without consent;
  • Disseminating or  posting  images  of  private  sexual  activity and/or  a  person’s intimate parts (including genitalia, groin, breasts or buttocks) without consent;
  • Allowing third parties to observe private sexual activity from a hidden location (g., closet) or through electronic means (e.g., Skype or livestreaming of images);
  • Prostituting another person; or
  • Exposing another person to a sexually transmitted infection or virus without the other’s knowledge.

F. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

Intimate Partner Violence includes any act of violence or threatened act of violence that occurs between individuals who are involved or have been involved in a sexual, dating, spousal, domestic, or other intimate relationship.[8] Intimate Partner Violence may include any form of Prohibited Conduct under this Policy, including Sexual Assault, Stalking, and Physical Assault (as defined herein). Intimate Partner Violence may involve a pattern of behavior used to establish power and control over another person through fear and intimidation, or may involve one-time conduct.  A pattern of behavior is typically determined based on the repeated use of words and/or actions and inactions in order to demean, intimidate, and/or control another person. This behavior can be verbal, emotional and/or physical. Examples of Intimate Partner Violence include, but are not limited to:

  • Slapping;
  • Pulling hair;
  • Punching;
  • Damaging one’s property;
  • Driving recklessly to scare someone;
  • Name calling;
  • Humiliating one in public;
  • Harassment directed toward a current or former partner or spouse; and/or
  • Threats of abuse such as threatening to hit, harm, or use a weapon on another (whether Complainant or acquaintance, friend, or family member of the Complainant), or other forms of verbal threats.

Harming Behavior that includes, but is not limited to, the true threat of or actual physical assault or abuse and also includes harassment, is prohibited pursuant to The Student Code. Harming Behavior will be addressed under this Policy if it involves Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual or Gender-Based Harassment, Intimate Partner Violence, or is part of a course of conduct under the Stalking definition.

G. STALKING

Stalking occurs when a person engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person under circumstances that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others, or to experience substantial emotional distress.

“Course of conduct” means two or more acts, including but not limited to acts in which a person directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about another person, or interferes with another person’s property.

“Substantial emotional distress” means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

“Reasonable person” means a person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the Complainant.

Stalking includes “cyber-stalking,” a particular form of stalking in which a person uses electronic media, such as the internet, social networks, blogs, phones, texts, or other similar devices or forms of contact.

Stalking may include, but is not limited to:

  • Non-consensual communications (face to face, telephone, e-mail);
  • Threatening or obscene gestures;
  • Surveillance/following/pursuit;
  • Showing up outside the targeted individual’s classroom or workplace;
  • Sending gifts (romantic, bizarre, sinister, or perverted); and/or
  • Making threats.

H. RETALIATION

Retaliation means any adverse action taken against a person for making a good faith report of Prohibited Conduct or participating in any proceeding under this Policy. Retaliation includes threatening, intimidating, harassing, coercing or any other conduct that would discourage a reasonable person from engaging in activity protected under this Policy. Retaliation may be present even where there is a finding of “no responsibility” on the allegations of Prohibited Conduct. Retaliation does not include good faith actions lawfully pursued in response to a report of Prohibited Conduct.

Retaliation can include, but is not limited to, actions taken by the University, actions taken by one Student against another Student, actions taken by an Employee against another Employee or Student, or actions taken by a Third Party against a Student or Employee.  See the University’s Non-Retaliation Policy [http://policy.uconn.edu/2011/05/24/non-retaliation-policy/].

I. COMPLICITY 

Complicity is any act taken with the purpose of aiding, facilitating, promoting or encouraging the commission of an act of Prohibited Conduct by another person.

X.   INAPPROPRIATE AMOROUS RELATIONSHIPS

For the purposes of this Policy, “amorous relationships” are defined as intimate, sexual, and/or any other type of amorous encounter or relationship, whether casual or serious, short-term or long-term.

A. INSTRUCTIONAL/STUDENT CONTEXT

All faculty and staff must be aware that amorous relationships with students are likely to lead to difficulties and have the potential to place faculty and staff at great personal and professional risk.  The power difference inherent in the faculty-student or staff-student relationship means that any amorous relationship between a faculty or staff member and a student is potentially exploitative or could at any time be perceived as exploitative and should be avoided.  Faculty and staff engaged in such relationships should be sensitive to the continuous possibility that they may unexpectedly be placed in a position of responsibility for the student’s instruction or evaluation.  In the event of a charge of Sexual Harassment arising from such circumstances, the University will in general be unsympathetic to a defense based upon consent when the facts establish that a faculty-student or staff-student power differential existed within the relationship.

  1. Undergraduate Students

Subject to the limited exceptions herein, all members of the faculty and staff are prohibited from pursuing or engaging in an amorous relationship with any undergraduate student.

  1. Graduate Students

With respect to graduate students (including but not limited to Master’s, Law, Doctoral, and any other post-baccalaureate students), all faculty and staff are prohibited from pursuing or engaging in an amorous relationship with a graduate student under that individual’s authority. Situations of authority include, but are not limited to: teaching; formal mentoring or advising; supervision of research and employment of a student as a research or teaching assistant; exercising substantial responsibility for grades, honors, or degrees; and involvement in disciplinary action related to the student.

Students and faculty/staff alike should be aware that pursuing or engaging in an amorous relationship with any graduate student will limit the faculty or staff member’s ability to teach, mentor, advise, direct work, employ and promote the career of the student involved with him or her in an amorous relationship.

  1. Graduate Students in Positions of Authority

Like faculty and staff members, graduate students may themselves be in a position of authority over other students, for example, when serving as a teaching assistant in a course or when serving as a research assistant and supervising other students in research.  The power difference inherent in such relationships means that any amorous relationship between a graduate student and another student over whom they have authority is potentially exploitative and should be avoided.  All graduate students currently or previously engaged in an amorous relationship with another student are prohibited from serving in a position of authority over that student.  Graduate students also should be sensitive to the continuous possibility that they may unexpectedly be placed in a position of responsibility for another student’s instruction or evaluation.

  1. Pre-existing Relationships with Any Student

The University recognizes that an amorous relationship may exist prior to the time a student enrolls at the University or, for amorous relationships with graduate students, prior to the time the faculty or staff member is placed in a position of authority over the graduate student.  The current or prior existence of such an amorous relationship must be disclosed to the Office of Institutional Equity and/or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations by the employee in a position of authority immediately if the student is an undergraduate, and prior to accepting a supervisory role of any type over any graduate student.

All faculty and staff currently or previously engaged in an amorous relationship with a student are prohibited from the following unless effective steps have been taken in conjunction with Labor Relations and the applicable dean or vice president to eliminate any potential conflict of interest in accordance with this Policy: teaching; formal mentoring or advising; supervising research; exercising responsibility for grades, honors, or degrees; considering disciplinary action involving the student; or employing the student in any capacity – including but not limited to student employment and internships, work study, or as a research or teaching assistant.

Similarly, all graduate students currently or previously engaged in an amorous relationship with another student are prohibited from serving in a position of authority over that student.

  1. If an Amorous Relationship Occurs with Any Student

If, despite these warnings, a faculty member, staff member, or graduate student becomes involved in an amorous relationship with a student in violation of this Policy, the faculty member, staff member, or graduate student must disclose the relationship immediately to the Office of Institutional Equity or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations.  Absent an extraordinary circumstance, no relationships in violation of this Policy will be permitted while the student is enrolled or the faculty or staff member is employed by the University.  In most cases, it will be unlikely that an acceptable resolution to the conflict of interest will be possible, and the faculty or staff member’s employment standing or the graduate student’s position of authority may need to be adjusted until s/he no longer has supervisory or other authority over the student.

In addition to the amorous relationship itself, a faculty, staff or graduate student’s failure to report the existence of an inappropriate amorous relationship with a student is also a violation of this Policy.  The University encourages immediate self-reporting, and will consider this factor in the context of any resolution that may be able to be reached.

B. EMPLOYMENT CONTEXT 

Amorous relationships between supervisors and their subordinate employees often adversely affect decisions, distort judgment, and undermine workplace morale for all employees, including those not directly engaged in the relationship.  Any University employee who participates in supervisory or administrative decisions concerning an employee with whom s/he has or has had an amorous relationship has a conflict of interest in those situations. These types of relationships, specifically those involving spouses and/or individuals who reside together, also may violate the State Code of Ethics for Public Officials as well as the University’s Policy on Employment and Contracting for Service of Relatives.

Accordingly, the University prohibits all faculty and staff from pursuing or engaging in amorous relationships with employees whom they supervise.  No supervisor shall initiate or participate in institutional decisions involving a direct benefit or penalty (employment, retention, promotion, tenure, salary, leave of absence, etc.) to a person with whom that individual has or has had an amorous relationship.  The individual in a position of authority can be held accountable for creating a sexually hostile environment or failing to address a sexually hostile environment and thus should avoid creating or failing to address a situation that adversely impacts the working environment of others.

  1. Pre-existing Amorous Relationships Between Supervisors and Subordinate Employees

The University recognizes that an amorous relationship may exist prior to the time an individual is assigned to a supervisor.  Supervisory, decision-making, oversight, evaluative or advisory relationships for someone with whom there exists or previously has existed an amorous relationship is unacceptable unless effective steps have been taken to eliminate any potential conflict of interest in accordance with this Policy.  The current or prior existence of such a relationship must be disclosed by the employee in a position of authority prior to accepting supervision of the subordinate employee to the Office of Institutional Equity and/or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations.  Working with the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations, the relevant managers will determine whether the conflict of interest can be eliminated through termination of the situation of authority.  The final determination will be at the sole discretion of the relevant dean or vice president.

  1. If an Amorous Relationship Occurs or has Occurred between a Supervisor and his/her Subordinate Employee

If, despite these warnings, a University employee enters into an amorous relationship with someone over whom s/he has supervisory, decision-making, oversight, evaluative, or advisory responsibilities, that employee must disclose the existence of the relationship immediately to the Office of Institutional Equity and/or the Office of Faculty and Staff Labor Relations.  In consultation with appropriate University administrators, the relevant dean or vice president will determine whether the conflict of interest can be eliminated.  The final determination will be at the sole discretion of the relevant dean or vice president.  In most cases, it will be unlikely that an acceptable resolution to the conflict of interest will be possible.  If the conflict of interest cannot be eliminated, the supervisor’s employment standing may need to be adjusted.  In addition to the amorous relationship itself, a supervisor’s failure to report the existence of the relationship with a subordinate employee is also a violation of this Policy.  The University encourages immediate self-reporting, and will consider this factor in the context of any resolution that may be able to be reached.

XI. PREVENTION, AWARENESS AND TRAINING PROGRAMS

The University is committed to the prevention of Prohibited Conduct through regular and ongoing education and awareness programs. Incoming Students and new Employees receive primary prevention and awareness programming as part of their orientation, and returning Students and current Employees receive ongoing training and related education and awareness programs. The University provides training, education and awareness programs to Students and Employees to ensure broad understanding of this Policy and the topics and issues related to maintaining an education and employment environment free from harassment and discrimination.

For a description of the University’s Prohibited Conduct prevention and awareness programs, including programs on minimizing the risk of incidents of Prohibited Conduct and bystander intervention, see the University’s annual Clery reports (found online at:  http://publicsafety.uconn.edu/police/clery/about-clery/uconn-and-the-clery-act/ ).

XII. OBLIGATION TO PROVIDE TRUTHFUL INFORMATION

All University community members are expected to provide truthful information in any report, investigation, or proceeding under this Policy. Submitting or providing false or misleading information in bad faith or with a view to personal gain or intentional harm to another in connection with an incident of Prohibited Conduct is prohibited and subject to disciplinary sanctions under The Student Code (for Students), The Code of Conduct (for Employees), and any other applicable and appropriate University policy or policies. This provision does not apply to reports made or information provided in good faith, even if the facts alleged in the report are not later substantiated.

XIII.  RELATED POLICIES

A. STUDENTS

Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code: http://community.uconn.edu/the-student-code-preamble/

B. EMPLOYEES AND THIRD PARTIES

Policy Statement: People With Disabilities: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=419
Protection of Minors and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect Policy: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=6754
Non-Retaliation Policy: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=415
Policy Statement: Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=102
Age Act Policy: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=2007
Code of Conduct (employees): http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=140
Code of Conduct for University of Connecticut Vendors:  http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=2718
Policy on Employment and Contracting for Service of Relatives: http://policy.uconn.edu/?p=357

XIV. POLICY REVIEW

This Policy is maintained by the Office of Institutional Equity. The University will periodically review and update this Policy and will evaluate, among other things, any changes in legal requirements, existing University resources, and the resolution of cases from the preceding year (including, but not limited to, timeframes for completion and sanctions and remedies imposed).
[1] UConn recognizes that an individual may choose to self-identify as a victim or a survivor.  For consistency in this Policy, the University uses the term Complainant to maintain the neutrality of the Policy and procedures.

[2] Definitions for all forms of Prohibited Conduct can be found in Section IX of this Policy.

[3] Although this Policy is directed primarily to disclosures by Students, as explained herein certain supervisory employees are obligated to report disclosures about all types of Prohibited Conduct involving a University employee.

[4] While Employees are encouraged to report any form of Prohibited Conduct, only Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence and Stalking must be reported under this Policy.

[5] These supervisory employees are required to report all forms of Prohibited Conduct where the Complainant or Respondent is an Employee.

[6]  This statement does not relieve Responsible Employees of their obligation to report Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence and/or Stalking involving a Student immediately to the Office of Institutional Equity.

[7] These definitions may overlap with Connecticut criminal statutes in some cases, and provide greater protection in other instances.  Connecticut’s Penal Code may be found in Title 53a of the Connecticut General Statutes.  (https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_950.htm)

[8] Intimate Partner Violence includes “dating violence” and “domestic violence,” as defined by VAWA. Consistent with VAWA, the University will evaluate the existence of an intimate relationship based upon the Complainant’s statement and taking into consideration the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Endowed Professorship Appointment and Renewal Process

Title: Endowed Professorship Appointment and Renewal Process
Policy Owner: Office of the Provost
Applies to: Faculty, Staff
Campus Applicability:  All Schools and Colleges at All Campuses
Effective Date:  April 16, 2015
For More Information, Contact The Office of the Provost
Contact Information: (860) 486-4037
Official Website:

 

Endowed Chairs and Endowed Professorships

Full-time academic staff appointed to endowed chairs or endowed professorships at the University of Connecticut are selected based on a distinguished record of scholarly or creative accomplishment, a strong record of teaching, and exemplary leadership and service to their school or college, the University, and the academic community.

Criteria for Appointment and Renewal

Individual schools and colleges may develop more specific criteria for appointment to and renewal of endowed chairs and endowed professorships, but all recommendations to the Provost must describe how the candidate meets the conditions associated with the endowment using one or more of the following criteria.

Scholarly or creative accomplishment
  • Distinguished and sustained record of achievement as evidenced by scholarly or creative publication in high quality outlets or by artistic performances or exhibitions in prestigious institutions.
  • University-wide, national, or international awards recognizing scholarly or creative contributions.
Teaching
  • Development of innovative teaching activities.
  • Successful mentorship of undergraduate and graduate students.
  • University-wide, national, or international awards recognizing teaching contributions.
Leadership, service, or public engagement
  • School, college, or University-wide level service.
  • Senior editorial positions in high quality scholarly journals.
  • Creative leadership in prestigious arts or creative organizations.
  • Significant leadership positions in national or international scholarly associations or societies.
  • Significant engagement with international, national, state, or local organizations (including government agencies).

Appointment and Renewal Process

  • Appointment to an endowed chair or an endowed professorship and renewal of an appointment requires a recommendation from the Dean of the school or college with which the professorship is associated to the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, who will decide whether to endorse the recommendation and forward it to the Board of Trustees for approval.
  • In making a recommendation to the Provost the Dean will solicit advice from a committee established and documented according to practices appropriate within the particular school or college. In particular, the committee might consist of (a) outstanding full professors within the school or college (a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor from outside the school or college can be included where appropriate), (b) full professors on the Dean’s Promotion, Tenure, and Review Committee, or (c) appropriate department heads and Associate Deans.Appointments will ordinarily be for a fixed term, with the possibility of renewal. In the case of an initial appointment, the committee may, when appropriate, solicit external letters to inform their recommendation. The Provost will consider exceptions to the ordinary procedures on a case by case basis.  The term associated with an endowed chair or endowed professorship will be determined at the discretion of the dean up to a maximum of 5 years.
  • The holder of an endowed chair or endowed professorship is ordinarily considered for a renewal appointment at the end of her/his appointment.
  • In the event that an endowed chair or endowed professorship becomes vacant, the dean may at her/his discretion appoint an individual to the position for the remainder of the term associated with the appointment.
  • Retired or emeritus faculty are ineligible for appointment or reappointment to an endowed chair or professorship. Faculty who retire while serving in an endowed position vacate the position upon retirement.

 

Policy for Education Abroad and Related Activities in Sites with U.S. Department of State Travel Warning/Travel Alert

Title: Policy for Education Abroad and Related Activities in Sites with U.S. Department of State Travel Warning/Travel Alert
Policy Owner: Global Affairs
Applies to: Undergraduate and Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Research Associates, Faculty, Staff
Campus Applicability: Storrs and Regional Campuses including the Law School
Effective Date: July 23, 2015
For More Information, Contact Assistant Vice President for Global Affairs
Contact Information:  860-486-2908
Official Website: http://global.uconn.edu/

 

REASON FOR POLICY

Global engagement is one of the four core values of the University of Connecticut, as presented in the University’s 2014 strategic planning document Creating Our Future: UCONN’s Path to Excellence. The University has long supported students, faculty and staff as they travel internationally for credit-bearing Education Abroad programs, internships, research, service learning and volunteer opportunities, conferences, registered student organization activities, student groups affiliated with academic departments, and other non-credit-bearing University programs. To further the University’s core values, ensure that students, faculty and staff have all relevant information and support they need while traveling abroad, and assess any potential risks and appropriate actions to reduce those risks, the University has established guidelines concerning  how, when and where students, faculty and staff may travel abroad for university-sponsored or university-related purposes. The University of Connecticut considers issues of terrorism, war, disease and other risks to travelers when assessing the appropriateness of university-sponsored or university-related international travel to a country with a U.S. Department of State Travel Warning or Travel Alert.

Accordingly, the University will not permit or support travel to any country with a U.S. Department of State Travel Warning or Travel Alert except pursuant to a Waiver approved by the Vice President for Global Affairs under this policy.

 

APPLIES TO

This policy applies to all undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral research associates, faculty and staff at the Storrs and regional campuses including the Law School traveling internationally for university-sponsored or university-related purposes. University-sponsored or university-related purposes include credit-bearing Education Abroad programs, internships, research, service learning and volunteer opportunities, conferences, registered student organization activities, student groups affiliated with academic departments, and other non-credit-bearing University programs.

This policy does not include travel through a program that is administered by another organization that has not been vetted and approved by UConn’s Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA) or does not have a formal agreement or exchange program with UConn.

This policy does not apply to students, faculty or staff who make the personal decision to travel internationally on a program or for a purpose not affiliated with the University and use their own funds, or other non-University funds, to support this travel. That is personal travel. This policy does not apply to personal travel. Personal travel includes additional independent travel before or after travel for university-sponsored or university-related purposes that is not part of the official university-sponsored or university-related itinerary. University-sponsored international health insurance does not cover personal travel by faculty, staff or students.

This policy does not apply to the University of Connecticut Health Center.

DEFINITIONS

“Education and Activities Abroad” and “Education Abroad and Related Activities” means any travel outside of the United States for university-sponsored or university-related purposes.

“Program Director” means the faculty or staff advisor, or in the case of a UConn Registered Student Organization or student group affiliated with an academic department of the University, the student leader of the Organization or student group, who is responsible for the planning and implementation of an Education and Activities Abroad program or travel opportunity. In the case of individual student, faculty or staff travel for university-sponsored or university-related purposes, the Program Director means the individual traveler.

“Risk Advisory Committee (RAC)” means the committee formed to review Waiver Applications for Education and Activities Abroad Programs in Countries with U.S. Department of State Travel Warnings/Travel Alerts. The RAC members include the Director of UConn’s Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA), a second and/or additional member(s) appointed by the Vice President for Global Affairs, and a representative from the Office of the General Counsel, or their successor in function. As appropriate to the proposed Education and Activities Abroad program or opportunity, the RAC may also seek input from representatives of the School or College associated with the Education and Activities Abroad program, the Division of Student Affairs, and/or any experts on country conditions of the proposed destination. The Chair of the RAC will be designated by the Vice President for Global Affairs.

“University-sponsored or university-related” means credit-bearing study abroad programs, internships, research, service learning and volunteer opportunities, conferences, registered student organization activities, student groups affiliated with academic departments, and other non-credit-bearing University programs. This includes the following:

–           Any travel in connection with activities for which academic credit is sought, including programs operated through UConn’s Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA), travel as part of a formal academic program or course of study, internship credit, and travel for independent study credit (including retroactive requests for academic credit).

–           Any travel for purposes of performance, sporting events, service learning, conferences, meetings, professional development or volunteerism organized by an academic department, a UConn Registered Student Organization or a student group affiliated with an academic department of the University.

–           Any travel for which funding is sought through a University-administered account or a student government-administered account within UConn.

–           Any travel that requires travel approval through UConn Travel Services and/or that requires international health insurance through a University-contracted insurance plan.

“Waiver Application” means the Waiver Application for Education and Activities Abroad Programs in Countries with U.S. Department of State Travel Warnings/Travel Alerts, administered by UConn’s Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA). The current version of the Waiver Application is attached as Appendix A.  The Waiver Application may be revised by the Vice President of Global Affairs from time to time consistent with this Policy.

POLICY STATEMENT

The University observes the following policy:

If the U.S. Department of State issues a travel warning/travel alert for a particular country or region within a country, UConn will suspend approval of any current Education and Activities Abroad program or individual university-sponsored or university-related travel by UConn students, postdoctoral research associates, faculty and/or staff and will not approve any new travel in that country as long as the travel warning/travel alert is in effect unless an application for a Waiver of this policy is submitted and approved by the Vice President for Global Affairs.  Without approval of the Waiver, university support is withdrawn. No academic credit will be awarded for programs in those countries, and reimbursement for the travel may be denied.

I.        Proposed Programs or Activities

When initiating a new Education or Activity Abroad opportunity, the Program Director or, in the case of individual travel, the student, faculty or staff member intending to travel, should review whether any destination country is the subject of any travel warnings or travel alerts issued by the U.S. Department of State. See http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/alertswarnings.html. All U.S. Department of State travel warnings and travel alerts applicable to the destination country must be disclosed and a Waiver sought as part of the proposal, even when the travel warning/travel alert covers a different region or state from the program’s in-country destination.

In reviewing the Waiver Application, the University will carefully review the actual U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert, as well as other sources, which may include recommendations of other countries such as Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia.

There may be legitimate academic reasons for developing or continuing a program or exchange in a country or in certain regions of a country while limiting travel to other regions of that same country. In some situations, a travel warning/travel alert may be very narrowly defined. For example, on May 5, 2015, the U.S. Department of State updated its travel warning for Mexico. That travel warning assessed security conditions for Mexico state-by-state. At that time the state of Oaxaca listed “no advisory is in effect,” while the state of Tamaulipas had a security advisory in effect. See http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/alertswarnings/mexico-travel-warning.html). In such a circumstance, upon careful review a Waiver might be granted for travel to Oaxaca State, while denied for travel to Tamaulipas State.

In reviewing the Waiver Application, the University will also carefully review any other pertinent factors brought to the University’s attention, such as any impact to University faculty and staff on sponsored research funding for projects that may not reach completion if the faculty or staff member were to be prohibited from travel or continued travel to a travel warning/travel alert country under this policy. When completing the Waiver Application, faculty or staff should note the existence of and any adverse consequences to sponsored research as part of the reasoning to permit the travel despite the existence of a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert.

Waiver Process

If a new Education or Activity Abroad program or opportunity is being proposed in any country where a travel warning or travel alert is current, the following process should be followed:

A.      When proposing university-sponsored or university-related international travel, certain forms are always required:  the “Education and Activities Abroad Program proposal request” form to be submitted for all student Education or Activity Abroad opportunities; the “Student Organization Off-Campus Event Advising” form to be submitted for all registered student organization travel; or the UConn Travel Office’s Travel WebForm providing for enrollment in international health insurance through the University-contracted international health insurance plan for faculty, staff and graduate assistant travel. In addition, for travel to any country where a travel warning or travel alert is in effect, a Waiver Application for Education and Activities Abroad Programs in Countries with U.S. Department of State Travel Warnings/Travel Alerts must be completed and submitted to the Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA). OGA:EA will provide the current Waiver Application form upon request.

B.      The Risk Advisory Committee (RAC) will review the Waiver Application. The RAC will then forward the Waiver Application with a recommendation to the Vice President for Global Affairs.

C.      Vice President’s Decision:

1.      Waiver Approved: If a Waiver is approved by the Vice President for Global Affairs, the travel warning/travel alert will be reviewed periodically by OGA:EA until a rescission or new travel warning/travel alert is issued by the U.S. Department of State. If a new travel warning/travel alert is issued, then the program will be reviewed as per the procedures below for current programs.

a.      All participants in the program will receive a copy of the U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert along with a copy of the completed Waiver Application. All prospective travelers will be interviewed by the proposed Program Director, representative of the OGA:EA, representative of the Division of Student Affairs, or other individuals who are developing the program. This interview will explain the program purpose and the environment in which it will take place (including health, safety and other program elements) and deliver information about the U.S. Department of State’s travel warning/travel advisory to enable travelers to make informed consent decisions as to their participation in the program.

b.      After prospective travelers have been interviewed and determined to be qualified to join the program, and only after the Waiver has been approved, all prospective travelers in the program will review and sign the Informed Consent and Release of Liability statement. It will be the responsibility of the Program Director of the proposed program to ensure that all program participants have completed an Informed Consent and Release of Liability statement prior to departure for the program. Completed and signed Informed Consent and Release of Liability forms should be submitted to OGA:EA. Current versions of the Informed Consent and Release of Liability forms are attached as Appendix B and Appendix C. They may be revised by the Vice President of Global Affairs from time to time consistent with this Policy.

c.       If a Waiver has been approved for travel to a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert country or region, additional travel to a different country or region subject to a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert country or region that was not considered as part of the Waiver Application is not permitted unless that additional travel has also been reviewed and approved through a subsequent Waiver Application in accordance with this policy.

d.      Refunds and Withdrawals: Travelers will be permitted to withdraw from a program for which a Waiver has been approved if they are not comfortable traveling to the country or region. Reasonable efforts will be made to find alternate programs for travelers to enroll in. If an alternate program cannot be found, reasonable efforts will be made to refund any fees already paid, but the actual amount of refund will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the OGA:EA.

2.      Waiver Application Denied: If the Vice President for Global Affairs determines that the Waiver Application should be denied due to the situation reflected in the U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert, the Program Director and/or the Director of the OGA:EA will notify any current program applicants.

a.      Reconsideration of the decision: When a Waiver Application is denied, the Program Director and the Director of the OGA:EA and/or Chair of the RAC will have the opportunity to confer with the Vice President for Global Affairs about the decision. The Program Director will have the opportunity to submit any new evidence of current country conditions that was not previously before the RAC. If the Vice President finds it appropriate, he or she may refer such evidence back to the RAC for further consideration. The decision as to whether to consider new evidence and reopen the review of the RAC will be at the sole discretion of the Vice President for Global Affairs.

b.      Refunds and Withdrawals: If money has already been collected for a program to a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert country and the Waiver Application is denied, the process for notification and refunds will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the Vice President based on recommendations from the OGA:EA.

c.       If a Waiver Application is denied, any student, faculty or staff member who makes the personal decision to travel to the location notwithstanding the denial does so as a private individual without a connection to the University. The travel will not be considered affiliated with or supported by the University, University funds will not be used to support the travel, and University-contracted international health insurance will not cover the travel. The University will have no obligation or liability in connection with such travel.

II.      Current Programs

If a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert is announced in a country where an existing Education or Activity Abroad program operates, the Vice-President for Global Affairs are authorized to summarily suspend the operation of the effected program(s) and require the safe and expeditious return of program participants to the University campus.

If this step is deemed not immediately warranted, the following procedures must be implemented:

A.      The Program Director or associated on-campus program facilitator must complete the Waiver Application for Education and Activities Abroad Programs in Countries with U.S. Department of State Travel Warnings/Travel Alerts and submit it to the OGA:EA within 48 hours of the issuance of the travel warning/travel alert.

B.      The Risk Advisory Committee (RAC) will review the Waiver Application as soon as possible, with a goal of within 2 business days of receipt of the Waiver Application. The RAC will then forward the Waiver Application with a recommendation to the Vice President for Global Affairs.

C.      Vice President’s decision:

1.      Waiver Approved: If a Waiver is approved by the Vice President for Global Affairs, the U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert will be reviewed periodically by OGA:EA until a rescission or new travel warning/travel alert occurs. If a new travel warning/travel alert is issued, then the program will be reviewed anew, as per the procedures above.

a.      If a Waiver is approved by the Vice President for Global Affairs, all travelers on that program will receive a copy of the U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert along with a copy of the completed Waiver Application. All travelers will be required to sign the Informed Consent and Release of Liability statement attesting that they have read the travel warning/travel alert and the Waiver Application and wish to continue with the program. If the traveler is under the age of 18, the traveler’s parents must review and sign these materials.

b.      If a Waiver has been approved for travel to a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert country or region, additional travel to a different country or region subject to a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert that was not considered as part of the Waiver Application is not permitted unless that additional travel has also been reviewed and approved through a subsequent Waiver Application in accordance with this policy.

c.       Refunds and Withdrawals: If a Waiver is approved by the Vice President for Global Affairs, travelers will be permitted to withdraw from the program for which the Waiver has been approved if they are not comfortable remaining in the country or region. Reasonable efforts will be made to allow any travelers who do withdraw to complete their coursework or program objectives after their return. Reasonable efforts will be made to refund any unused or unapplied fees, but the actual amount of refund will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the OGA:EA.

2.      Waiver Application Denied:  If upon review, the Vice President for Global Affairs determines that a program should be cancelled or suspended due to the situation reflected the U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert, the Program Director and/or the Director of the OGA:EA will notify all current travelers and institute procedures to return travelers to the University campus or other safe location.

a.      Reconsideration of the decision:  When a Waiver Application is denied, the Program Director or associated on-campus program facilitator, alongside the Director of OGA:EA and/or Chair of the RAC, will have the opportunity to confer with the Vice President for Global Affairs about the decision. The Program Director will have the opportunity to submit any new evidence of current country conditions that was not previously before the RAC. If the Vice President finds it appropriate, he or she may refer such evidence back to the RAC for further consideration. The decision as to whether to consider new evidence and reopen the review of the RAC will be at the sole discretion of the Vice President for Global Affairs.

b.      Refund and Withdrawals: If the Vice President for Global Affairs determines that a program should be cancelled or terminated due to a U.S. Department of State travel warning/travel alert, reasonable efforts will be made to refund any unused or unapplied fees, but the actual amount of refund will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the OGA:EA.

c.       If a Waiver Application is denied, any student, faculty or staff member who continues to make the personal decision to travel to or continue travel in the location notwithstanding that denial does so as a private individual without a connection to the University. The travel will not be considered affiliated with or supported by the University, University funds will not be used to support the travel, and University-contracted international health insurance will not cover the travel. The University will have no obligation or liability in connection with such travel.

ENFORCEMENT

Violations of this policy may result in appropriate disciplinary measures in accordance with University Laws and By-Laws, General Rules of Conduct for All University Employees, applicable collective bargaining agreements, and the University of Connecticut Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code.

The University reserves the right to deny academic credit, funding or reimbursement for any university-sponsored or university-related international travel that is considered inconsistent with published policies and practices.

Appendix

Appendix A: Waiver Application for Education and Activities Abroad Programs in Countries with U.S. Department of State Travel Warnings/Travel Alerts

Appendix B- For Students: Informed Consent and Release of Liability for Travel Abroad to U.S. Department of State Travel Warning/ Travel Alert Country

Appendix C- For Faculty/Staff/Other (Non-Students): Informed Consent and Release of Liability for Travel Abroad to a U.S. Department of State Travel Warning/Travel Alert Country

 

Guideline for the Employment of Graduate Students

Title: Guideline for the Employment of Graduate Students
Guideline Owner: Office of the Provost
Applies to: Faculty, Staff, Units
Campus Applicability: Storrs and Regional Campuses
Effective Date: February 1, 2017
For More Information, Contact Office of the Provost
Contact Information:  860-486-4037
Official Website:  http://provost.uconn.edu/

 

GUIDELINE FOR THE EMPLOYMENT OF GRADUATE STUDENTS

Revised February 1, 2017

Purpose

The purpose of this guideline is to clarify federal regulations, state law, and university policy pertinent to the employment of graduate students at the University of Connecticut. Units that seek to employ graduate students should be careful to use the appropriate employment mechanism considering the nature of the work and the tax implications for the student.

Existing Law and Policy

The University defines graduate assistants as graduate students “who provide teaching or research support to the University that is a part of his/her academic program,” and requires that all assistantships be administered through an academic department. (See http://grad.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1635/2014/08/GADefinitions.pdf.)

This definition is intended to align with the federal Tax Code Section 117(c), which provides that scholarships and tuition reductions are taxable income to the student (and thus potentially subject to withholding like wages) when they represent “payment for teaching, research or other services by the student required as a condition for receiving” the scholarship or tuition reduction.

That statute also, however, provides a narrow and specific exception for a graduate student at a college or university “who is engaged in teaching or research activities for such organization” (§ 117(d)(5)). This provision allows the University to provide Research Assistants and Teaching Assistants their tuition waivers tax-free. In cases where Graduate Assistants are not engaged in teaching or research activities for the University, IRS guidance requires the University to withhold extra taxes from these Graduate Assistants’ paychecks as though they were paid the waiver in cash, less an allowable exclusion of $5,250 per calendar year.

In addition, state law requires the University to waive tuition for Graduate Assistants (Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 10a-105).

Employment of graduate students

There are several mechanisms by which units can employ graduate students at the University of Connecticut. The following chart illustrates the appropriate mechanism for hiring a graduate student, as described in more depth below, along with guidance about when each is appropriate.

 

 

Title Function Timeframe Payroll
Graduate Assistant (GEU-UAW) Graduate students who provide teaching or research support to the University as part of his/her academic program Academic Year Graduate Payroll
Graduate Special Payroll Lecturer (GEU-UAW) Graduate students who are serving as the instructor of record. Summer and Winter Intersession Special Payroll
Graduate Instructional Specialists (GEU-UAW) Graduate students who are appointed to work in an instructional support capacity Summer and Winter Intersession Special Payroll
Graduate Student Technician (GEU-UAW) Graduate students who are performing research activities for the University Summer and Winter Intersession Special Payroll
Student Labor Graduate students who are performing a wide-range of functions (administrative, social services, library, maintenance, etc) At any point Student Payroll
Work Study Graduate students who are participating in the federal need-based financial aid work program. At any point Student Payroll
Interns and Fellows Graduate students who perform work as part of their academic programs typically outside the University and typically for course credit in their program of study Academic Year Graduate Payroll

 

Graduate assistantships – Academic Year

During the academic year, Graduate Assistants receive a tuition waiver, a stipend, and health insurance in exchange for performing teaching, research, or other duties for the university. Graduate Assistants are members of the GEU-UAW bargaining unit and their employment is governed by the collective bargaining agreement effective July 1, 2015.

Graduate Assistants are expected to work an average of twenty hours per week (considered a “full GA,” or a 100% appointment). Occasionally, units may appoint a Graduate Assistant for less than twenty hours per week, typically fifteen hours (a 75% appointment) or ten hours (a 50% appointment). Under state law, these Graduate Assistants receive a full waiver of their tuition despite their reduced work hours, and thus the University expects units to use these partial appointments very judiciously only to meet special needs, such as to align with the timeline of a research grant or to cover an unexpected teaching need.

As a consequence of the University’s definition of a Graduate Assistant, it is the University’s expectation that all Graduate Assistants will have assignments that substantially involve work that supports the teaching or research missions of the University, or both. Thus, Graduate Assistants are usually assigned as Teaching Assistants or Research Assistants or a combination of the two. Since the University’s teaching mission involves a large array of activities beyond traditional classroom instruction, Graduate Assistants may also be assigned to support implementation of instructional technologies, advising programs, cultural programs, learning communities, and other co-curricular activities.

Graduate assistantships – Summer and Winter Intersession

Graduate students who perform teaching or research activities for the University as part of an academic program during the summer months or the winter intersession are also governed by the GEU-UAW collective bargaining agreement and are hired through special payroll. Graduate Assistants in the summer or intersession who serve as the instructor of record should be hired as Graduate Special Payroll Lecturers. Graduate Assistants who are providing various levels of instructional support should be hired as Graduate Instructional Specialists. Graduate Assistants who are providing research functions should be hired as Graduate Student Technicians. Detailed information about summer graduate student titles is available at: http://hr.uconn.edu/special-payroll-manual-offer-letters-forms.

Graduate assistantships – Not Substantially Related to Meeting Teaching and Research Missions

When a unit seeks to offer work to a graduate student that is not substantially related to meeting teaching or research needs, the University expects units to use one of the mechanisms described below (student labor, or work study,) to employ that student. In particular, work that is predominantly administrative in nature should be accomplished through these means.

There may be exceptional cases when a unit determines that a graduate assistantship is the best means to appoint a student even though the student’s work will not substantially involve teaching or research. While inconsistent with University definitions and expectations, Federal regulations do not prohibit Graduate Assistants from performing duties other than as Teaching Assistants or Research Assistants. If a unit seeks to employ a Graduate Assistant for work other than teaching or research, the unit must obtain permission to do so from the Dean of the Graduate School. Further, the unit must inform the student in the appointment offer letter that the tuition waiver they will receive is likely to be taxable, and thus their stipend will be subject to withholding. Units should also be aware that these Graduate Assistants will be members of the GEU-UAW bargaining unit and thus covered by the collective bargaining agreement.

Student labor

According to the University’s policies and procedures related to student employment, graduate students may be employed as temporary, non-exempt hourly workers. These graduate students are not considered Graduate Assistants, and should not be coded or compensated as GAs, RAS, or TAs, and are not covered by the collective bargaining agreement. They may fulfill positions requiring various levels of skill and experience, from trainee-level jobs to supervisory and highly technical jobs. These jobs may support a wide range of University functions, including research, administration, information technology, fiscal management, library, maintenance, recreation/athletics, social services, academic services, public services, and the arts. The job duties, work hours, and schedules of graduate students employed on the student labor payroll are set by the hiring department. Levels of pay follow a set schedule depending on job requirements. Students on student labor receive bi-weekly paychecks for hours worked. Generally, it is expected that full-time students work no more than twenty hours per week, except during breaks when it is expected they will work no more than forty hours per week. Detailed information about student employment is available at http://studentjobs.uconn.edu/employment-guide/.

Work-study

Work-study is a federal need-based financial aid work program that allows students (including graduate students) to earn money to meet educational expenses as temporary, non-exempt hourly workers. These graduate students are not considered Graduate Assistants, and should not be coded or compensated as GAs, RAS, or TAs, and are not covered by the collective bargaining agreement. The jobs and levels of pay are the same as those available through student labor, but these are funded 75 percent by financial aid awards made by Office of Student Financial Aid Services and 25 percent by the hiring unit. Work hours and schedules depend on job requirements and are set by the hiring department, and work-study students receive bi-weekly paychecks for hours worked. The total number of hours a work-study student has available to work is dictated by the pay rate associated with their job and the amount of the student’s work-study award. Once the award is exhausted, a unit may continue to fund and employ the student in the same job on the student labor payroll. Detailed information about student employment is available at http://studentjobs.uconn.edu/employment-guide/.

Interns and fellows

As defined in University policy, an internship is an experiential job placement designed to enhance the knowledge, skills, and abilities of a student and enhance their employability. Interns perform work as part of their academic programs, typically in an entity outside the university and typically for course credit in their program of study. Graduate students appointed as interns are not Graduate Assistants, and should not be coded or compensated as GAs, RAs, or TAs. To aid graduate interns in the pursuit of their studies, the University may provide scholarships to cover their tuition and/or health insurance. Additionally, interns may occasionally receive compensation for services they perform for their host organization, which, when administered by the University, is paid through Payroll and subject to tax withholding.

A fellowship is awarded to a graduate student to pursue his or her academic program, but does not require the student to do work for the University. Graduate fellows may receive funding from the University or another source that may cover their tuition and provide stipends and health insurance.

Under certain conditions, scholarships (including health insurance subsidies) provided to interns and fellows may be taxable. In cases where a student is provided a scholarship or tuition waiver that is not connected to employment, however, the University is has no general obligation to report the scholarship income or withhold any tax, except in limited cases involving international students. For the majority of students, it is entirely up to the student to claim scholarship income on his or her tax return.

 

Student International Travel Policy

Title: Student International Travel Policy
Policy Owner: Office of Global Affairs
Applies to: Students
Campus Applicability: All Campuses except UConn Health
Effective Date: July 23, 2015
For More Information, Contact Assistant Vice President for Global Affairs
Contact Information: 860-486-2908
Official Website:  http://global.uconn.edu/

 

REASON FOR POLICY

Global engagement is one of the four core values of the University of Connecticut, as presented in the University’s 2014 strategic planning document Creating Our Future: UCONN’s Path to Excellence. The University has long supported students as they travel internationally for credit-bearing Education Abroad programs, internships, research, service learning and volunteer opportunities, conferences, registered student organization activities, student groups affiliated with academic departments, and other non-credit-bearing University programs. The purpose of this policy is to facilitate the following objectives:

  1. Ensuring student access to information essential to their travel abroad.
  2. Assessment of any potential risks and appropriate actions to reduce those risks.
  3. University awareness of when and where students are taking advantage of these Education Abroad and related opportunities.

APPLIES TO 

This policy applies to all undergraduate and graduate students at the Storrs and regional campuses including the Law School traveling internationally for university-sponsored or university-related purposes. University-sponsored or university-related purposes include credit-bearing Education Abroad programs, internships, research, service learning and volunteer opportunities, conferences, registered student organization activities, student groups affiliated with academic departments, and other non-credit-bearing University programs. This includes the following:

  •  Any travel in connection with activities for which academic credit is sought, including programs operated through UConn’s Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA), travel as part of a formal academic program or course of study, internship credit, and travel for independent study credit (including retroactive requests for academic credit).
  • Any travel for purposes of performance, sporting events, service learning, conferences, meetings, professional development or volunteerism organized by a UConn registered student organization or student group affiliated with an academic department of the University.
  • Any travel for which funding is sought through a University-administered account or a student government-administered account within UConn.
  • Any travel that requires travel approval through UConn Travel Services and/or that requires international health insurance through the University-contracted insurance plan.

This policy does not include student travel through a program that is administered by another organization that has not been vetted and approved by OGA:EA or does not have a formal agreement or exchange program with UConn.

This policy does not apply to students who make the personal decision to travel internationally on a program not affiliated with the University and use their own funds, or other non-University funds, to support this travel. That is personal travel. This policy does not apply to personal travel. Personal travel includes additional independent travel before or after travel for university-sponsored or university-related purposes that is not part of the official university-sponsored or university-related itinerary. University-sponsored international health insurance does not cover personal travel.

This policy does not apply to students of the University of Connecticut Health Center.

POLICY STATEMENT

Any student who travels internationally for university-sponsored or university-related purposes, as defined above, is required to register with the Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA).

Registration with the Office of Global Affairs: Education Abroad (OGA:EA)

Specifically, any student who travels internationally for university-sponsored or university-related purposes is required to:

a. University Registration.  Register with the OGA:EA;

b. Health Insurance.  Through the OGA:EA, register for University-contracted (or other suitable) international health insurance coverage;

c. Itinerary and Contacts.  Submit up-to-date itinerary information to the OGA:EA, including personal and emergency contact information (both U.S. and international), host program/entity contact information (as appropriate), travel itineraries and international accommodations;

d. Updated Itinerary Upon Changes.  Promptly provide updated travel itineraries and accommodations to OGA:EA as they develop, especially if/as these change during the course of travel;

e. Contract Requirements.  Read and sign any appropriate contract documents (e.g. the Education Abroad Student Contract) that pertain to the Education Abroad program in which the student is participating;

f. State Department Registration.  Register with the U.S. Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP), http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/go/step.html; and

g. State Department Acknowledgement.  Acknowledge, via electronic signature, having researched and read any U.S. Department of State Travel Advisory for the destination country/countries. If the destination country/countries has a travel warning or travel alert and the University has reviewed and granted permission for the student to participate in accordance with the Policy for Education Abroad and Related Activities in Sites with a U.S. Department of State Travel Warning/Travel Alert, the student is required to review and sign the University’s Informed Consent and Release of Liability for Travel Abroad to a Travel Warning/Travel Alert Country in accordance with that applicable policy.

Conduct while Traveling for University-Sponsored or University-Related Purposes

While away from campus, students are required to honor the University’s Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code, as well as any appropriate contract documents (e.g. the Education Abroad Student Contract) that pertain to the UConn international program in which they are participating. Students must further adhere to the codes of conduct established by faculty directors, hosting entities/institutions, and/or professional practice applicable to the UConn international program in which they are participating. Students traveling internationally are subject to all local laws and to discipline under The Student Code.

ENFORCEMENT

Violations of this policy may result in disciplinary measures in accordance with the University of Connecticut Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code.

The University reserves the right to deny academic credit, funding or reimbursement for any student international travel that is inconsistent with published policies and practices.

Related Policy

See also:  Policy for Education Abroad and Related Activities in Sites with a U.S. Department of State Travel Warning/Travel Alert

Policy History

Adopted: July 23, 2015 [Approved by the President’s Cabinet]